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public struct customerItemListStruct { 
        public int ID { get; set; } 
        public string name { get; set; } 
        public double rate { get; set; } 
        public int quantity { get; set; } 
        //public double total = rate * quantity; 

}

I want to pre- set the value of total.

Suggest me the best way! Thank you!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
public double total
{
    get
    {
        return rate * quantity;
    }
}
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You probably should not be using a struct for this entity. Mutable structs are evil and down this way madness lies.

The following would probably be more appropriate:

public class CustomerItemList { 
    public int ID { get; set; } 
    public string Name { get; set; } 
    public double Rate { get; set; } 
    public int Quantity { get; set; } 
    public double Total {
      get { return Rate * Quantity; }
    }
}
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If the item is expected to have value semantics, making it a mutable class is a recipe for disaster. If one calls SomeDataSource.GetCustomer(whatever) and gets a CustomerItemList, will changes to the list (1) predictably affect the item in the data source, (2) predictably affect nothing else in the universe unless or until the changed item is passed back to the data source, or (3) affect other things in the universe in arbitrary and not-necessarily-predictable ways? Mutable class types can do any of the above; open-field structs consistently do the second. –  supercat Oct 24 '12 at 18:52
    
@supercat Good points. If the constraints you mention are of issue then the Actor pattern would be an appropriate choice. Mutable value types are generally harder for OO programmers to reason about because they're semantics are different, no worse, just different. Structs are most certainly not evil - they just can be when used incorrectly. Based on the name CustomerItemList it feels as if a struct may be the wrong choice here. –  rich.okelly Oct 25 '12 at 11:56
    
Based on the name, I might agree, though given the content I'd say the name should more likely be CustomerListItem. One of my peeves with programming is the notion that the Promiscuous Object Reference is the correct data type for everything (in Java, it's the only non-primitive). In many contexts, it's useful to have code read something, change it, and write it back (either overwriting the old item, or creating a new item which is similar to the old one). In such contexts, the object is being used as a piecewise-mutable value, and it would seem most natural to represent it as such. –  supercat Oct 25 '12 at 15:03

Existing answers cover the simplest way of doing this. However, if you are likely to be accessing Total a lot more than you are likely to be updating Rate and Quantity then you can change thigns around so that rather than calculating Total every time you access it you just recalculate it when you change Rate or Quantity.

public class CustomerItemListStruct { 
    public int ID { get; set; } 
    public string Name { get; set; } 
    public double Total { get; private set; }

    public double Rate { 
        get { return _rate;}
        set { _rate = value; UpdateTotal();} 
    } 
    private double _rate;

    public int Quantity {
        get { return _quantity;}
        set { _quantity = value; UpdateTotal();} 
    }
    private int _quantity;


    private void UpdateTotal()
    {
        Total = Quantity*Rate;
    }
}

Usually making Total do the calculations is the best way to go but it is always useful to be aware of the alternatives in case they are important.

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