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it looks like delete & destroy both remove the record from the db when dealing with a has_many. Is there anyway to not do this. In other words I would like to trim a has_mnay collection before passing it to a method but I dont want my changes to persist to the db. In trying it on the console, it seems to delete immediately when I do

second_acct = users.accounts[1]
users.accounts.delete(second_acct)

My use case would be something like I want to pass only checking accounts down to a method, so I want to remove these accounts from the user.

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To make sure im clear here, I dont want to touch the db, I only want to remove the relationship in memory –  Joelio Feb 17 '12 at 15:50
    
Did you ever find a way to do this? –  Garrett Lancaster May 16 '13 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

second_acct = users.accounts[1]
second_acct.update_attribute(:user_id, nil)

This should work.

Or this:

second_acct.user = nil
second_acct.save
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How are your association set up?

collection.delete(object, …)
    Removes one or more objects from the collection by setting their foreign keys to NULL. Objects will be in addition destroyed if they’re associated with :dependent => :destroy, and deleted if they’re associated with :dependent => :delete_all.

So, if you don't want your records to be deleted and only the association to be cleared, remove :dependent => :destroy or :dependent => :delete_all option.

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I have dependent => :destroy, when I really delete them I want them cleared from the db. In the case above I dont want to touch the db, just remove them from the collection in memory.. –  Joelio Feb 17 '12 at 15:49

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