Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Google returns Unparsable Cuft to the json response like this:

throw 1; <dont be evil> { foo: bar}
  • My current web applications use jQuery.Ajax to retrieve JSON data. How should they be modified to consume valid data?

Here is a relevant demo

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should probably remove the beginning part from the response:

$.ajax(url, {
    dataType: "jsonp text",
    success: function(data) {
        var jsonString = data.replace(/^throw 1; <dont be evil> /, "");
        var responseObject = $.parseJSON(jsonString);

        // do something with responseObject
        ...
    }
}


UPDATE:

To make the re-writing available in every Ajax call you could also register a global Ajax Converter in jQuery:

$.ajaxSetup({
    converters: {
        "text cleanedjson": function(data) {
            var jsonString = data.replace(/^throw 1; <dont be evil> /, "");
            return $.parseJSON(jsonString);
        }
    }
});

$.ajax(url, {
    dataType: "jsonp cleanedjson",
    success: function(responseObject) {
        // do something with responseObject
        ...
    }
});

You will still need to specify your defined dataType in the request options.


UPDATE 2: If you need to tweak your existing calls to do the response cleanup automatically, you could patch jQuery's ajax implementation to automatically use your converter in certain situations:

// store reference to original implementation
$._ajax_original = $.ajax;

// redefine jQuery's ajax function
$.ajax = function(url, settings) {
    if (… your test for applicability here (e.g. an url check) …) {
        settings.dataType = "jsonp cleanedjson";
    }
    return $._ajax_original(url, settings);
};

​ Note that this redefinition has to included after loading jQuery and before the first Ajax call is made. You may also need to consider that $.ajax can also be called without a separate url parameter...

share|improve this answer
    
data.substring("throw1; <dont be evil> ".length) is actually way faster, at least on V8. – Linus Gustav Larsson Thiel Feb 18 '12 at 13:35
    
Definitely an alternative, but "way faster", for a single replacement? Most likely absolutely irrelevant... – Julian D. Feb 18 '12 at 13:41
    
I'm using Telerik controls and editing the $.ajax command means I have to edit the source code and recompile. I was thinking I could leave things as-is, and use prototype to redefine the "global ajax command" and allow all my compiled JSON to go unmodified. Thoughts? – LamonteCristo Feb 18 '12 at 14:51
    
Thanks for the update. This is my first time redefining anything on jQuery. Rather than define my own converter, can I redefine the "base/root" definition for JSON AJAX responses. My goal is to avoid editing the source code and recompiling. I believe this is required with the DataType setting you mention. – LamonteCristo Feb 18 '12 at 22:11
    
I have added a part about patching jQuery's ajax function. I would definitely not recommend tweaking the underlying XHR objects: handling the different implementations for all browsers would be quite some work... – Julian D. Feb 19 '12 at 22:47

I achieved this a little simpler taking advantage of the $.ajaxSetup method:

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajaxSetup/

and using converters:

$.ajaxSetup({
    converters: {
        "text json": function (stringData) {
            return jQuery.parseJSON(stringData.replace("for(;;);", ""));
        }
    }
});

What this does is tap into every ajax call and makes the necessary conversion/replacement on the fly. It essentially takes your object which it reads as "text", replaces the unparseable cruft, and spits out a new json object.

Works great. I set it and forget it and it won't interfere with any non-tainted json.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.