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My Problem: My Completionport Server will receive Data of unknown size from different clients, the thing is, that i don't know how avoid buffer overruns/ how to avoid my (receiving) buffer being "overfilled" with data.

now to the Quesitons: 1) If i make a receive call via WSARecv, does the workerthread work like a callback function ? I mean, does it dig up the receive call only when it has completed or does it also dig it up when the receiving is happening ? Does the lpNumberOfBytes (from GetQueuedCompletionStatus) variable contain the number of bytes received till now or the total number of bytes received ?

2) How to avoid overruns, i thought of dynamically allocated buffer structures, but then again, how do i find out how big the package is going to get ?

edit: i hate to ask this, but is there any "simple" method for managing the buffer and to avoid overruns ? synchronisations sounds off limit to me, atleast right now

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2 Answers 2

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If i make a receive call via WSARecv, does the workerthread work like a callback function ?

See @valdo post. Completion data si queued to your pool of threads and one will be made ready to process it.

'I mean, does it dig up the receive call only when it has completed?' Yes - hence the name. Note that the meaning of 'completed' may vary. depending on the protocol. With TCP, it means that some streamed data bytes have been received from the peer.

'Does the lpNumberOfBytes (from GetQueuedCompletionStatus) variable contain the number of bytes received till now or the total number of bytes received ?' It contains the number of bytes received and loaded into the buffer array provided in that IOCP completion only.

'How to avoid overruns, i thought of dynamically allocated buffer structures, but then again, how do i find out how big the package is going to get ?' You cannot get overruns if you provide the buffer arrays - the kernel thread/s that load the buffer/s will not exceed the passed buffer lengths. At application level, given the streaming nature of TCP, it's up to you to decide how to process the buffer arrays into useable application-level protocol-units. You must decide, using your knowledge of the services provided, on a suitable buffer management scheme.

Last IOCP server was somwewhat general-purpose. I used an array of buffer pools and a pool of 'buffer-carrier' objects, allocated at startup, (along with a pool of socket objects). Each buffer pool held buffers of a different size. Upon a new connection, I issued an WSARecv using one buffer from the smallest pool. If this buffer got completely filled, I used a buffer from the next largest pool for the next WSARecv, and so on.

Then there's the issue of the sequence numbers needed to prevent out-of-order buffering with multiple handler threads :(

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_1. Completion port is a sort of a queue (with sophisticated logic concerning priority of threads waiting to dequeue an I/O completion from it). Whenever an I/O completes (either successfully or not), it's queued into the completion port. Then it's dequeued by one of the thread called GetQueuedCompletionStatus.

So that you never dequeue an I/O "in progress". Moreover, it's processed by your worker thread asynchronously. That is, it's delayed until your thread calls GetQueuedCompletionStatus.

_2. This is actually a complex matter. Synchronization is not a trivial task overall, especially when it comes to symmetric multi-threading (where you have several threads, each may be doing everything).

One of the parameters you receive with a completed I/O is a pointer to an OVERLAPPED structure (that you supplied to the function that issued I/O, such as WSARecv). It's a common practice to allocate your own structure that is based on OVERLAPPED (either inherits it or has it as the first member). Upon receiving a completion you may cast the dequeued OVERLAPPED to your actual data structure. There you may have everything needed for the synchronization: sync objects, state description and etc.

Note however that it's not a trivial task to synchronize things correctly (to have a good performance and avoid deadlocks) even when you have the custom context. This demands an accurate design.

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