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I have to do a simple task, but I don't know how to do it and I'm staked. I need to intersperse the lines of two different files each 4 lines:

File 1:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

FILE 2:

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L

Desired result:

1
2
3
4
A
B
C
D
5
6
7
8
E
F
G
H
9
10
11
12
I
J
K
L

I'm looking for a sed, awk or python script, or any other bash command.

Thanks for your time!!

I tried to do it using specific python libraries that recognize the 4 lines modules of each files. But It doesn't work and now I trying to do it without this libraries, but don't know how.

import sys
from Bio import SeqIO
from Bio.Seq import Seq
from Bio.SeqRecord import SeqRecord


def main(forward,reverse):

    for F, R in zip ( SeqIO.parse(forward, "fastq"), SeqIO.parse(reverse, "fastq") ):

        fastq_out_F = SeqRecord( F.seq, id = F.id, description = "" )
        fastq_out_F.letter_annotations["phred_quality"] = F.letter_annotations["phred_quality"]

        fastq_out_R = SeqRecord( R.seq, id = R.id, description = "" )
        fastq_out_R.letter_annotations["phred_quality"] = R.letter_annotations["phred_quality"]

        print fastq_out_F.format("fastq"),
        print fastq_out_R.format("fastq"),


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main(sys.argv[1], sys.argv[2])  
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5  
How about making an attempt? –  Gerrat Feb 17 '12 at 15:00
3  
What have you tried? –  Rik Poggi Feb 17 '12 at 15:02
1  
As Gerrat [EDIT: and Rik Poggi] said: Show us what you've tried. You are unlikely to get much help (and especially unlikely to get it from the best people) if you just ask Stack Overflow to do your work for you. Demonstrate that you've made a genuine attempt yourself, and you'll not only show that you're asking in good faith but also make it clearer where the difficulties lie. –  Gareth McCaughan Feb 17 '12 at 15:06
    
I tried to do it using specific python libraries to parse my files... –  Geparada Feb 17 '12 at 15:12
1  
+1 It's a good question. –  kev Feb 17 '12 at 16:05
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This might work for you:(using GNU sed)

sed -e 'n;n;n;R file2' -e 'R file2' -e 'R file2' -e 'R file2' file1

or using paste/bash:

paste -d' ' <(paste -sd'   \n' file1) <(paste -sd'   \n' file2) | tr ' ' '\n'

or:

parallel -N4 --xapply 'printf "%s\n%s\n" {1} {2}'  :::: file1 :::: file2
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Very creative! –  kev Feb 17 '12 at 16:03
    
Thanks @kev on reflection xargs could also provide a solution. –  potong Feb 17 '12 at 16:13
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It can be done in pure bash:

f1=""; f2=""
while test -z "$f1" -o -z "$f2"; do
  { read LINE && echo "$LINE" && \
      read LINE && echo "$LINE" && \
      read LINE && echo "$LINE" && \
      read LINE && echo "$LINE"; } || f1=end;
  { read -u 3 LINE && echo "$LINE" && \
      read -u 3 LINE && echo "$LINE" && \
      read -u 3 LINE && echo "$LINE" && \
      read -u 3 LINE && echo "$LINE"; } || f2=end;
done < f1 3< f2

The idea is to use a new file descriptor (3 in this case) and read from stdin and this file descriptor at the same time.

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A mix of paste and sed can also be used if you do not have GNU sed:

paste -d '\n' f1 f2 | sed -e 'x;N;x;N;x;N;x;N;x;N;x;N;x;N;s/^\n//;H;s/.*//;x'

If you are not familiar with sed, there is a 2nd buffer called the hold space where you can save data. The x command exchanges the current buffer with the hold space, the N command appends one line to the current buffer, and the H command appends the current buffer to the hold space.

So the first x;N save the current line (from f1 because of paste) in the hold space and read the next line (from f2 because of paste), then each x;N;x;N read a new line from f1 and f2, and the script finishes by removing the new line from the 4 lines of f2, puts the lines from f2 at the end of the lines of f1, clean the hold space for the next run and print the 8 lines.

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The code you posted looks extremely complicated. There is a rule of thumb with programming: there is always a simpler solution. In your case, way simpler.

First thing you should do is determine the limitations of the input. Are you going to process really big files? Or are they going to be only of one-or-two-kilobyte size? It matters.

Second thing: look at the tools you have. With Python, you've got file objects, lists, generators and so on. Try to combine these tools to produce the desired result.

In your particular case, there are some unclear points. What should the script do if the input files have different size? Or one of them is empty? Or the number of lines is not a factor of four? You should decide how to handle corner cases like these.

I'm not going to provide a complete solution but will give you a few links that will help you instead. What you have to take a look at is the file object, xrange, list slicing and list comprehensions. If you prefer doing it the cool way, you should take a look at the itertools module.

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Try this, changing the appropriate filename values for f1 and f2.

awk 'BEGIN{
  sectionSize=4; maxSectionCnt=sectionSize; maxSectionCnt++
  notEof1=notEof2=1
  f1="file1" ; f2="file2"
   while (notEof1 && notEof2) {
    if (notEof1) {
      for (i=1;i<maxSectionCnt;i++) {
        if (getline < f1 >0 ) { print "F1:" i":" $0 } else {notEof1=0}
      }
    }
    if (notEof2) {
      for (i=1;i<maxSectionCnt;i++) {
        if (getline < f2 >0 ) { print "F2:" i":" $0 } else {notEof2=0}
      }
    }
  }
}'

You can also remove the "F1: i":" etc record header. I added that help debug code.

As Pastafarianist rightly points out, you may need to modify this if you have expectations about what will happen if the files are not the same size, etc.

I hope this helps.

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