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I'm working on an application which we're going to use to simulate users working on a system. One of the goals is to stress test the application by letting a lot of users perform tasks.

A user is simply a backgroundworker at this point. Now, no matter how many 'users' I spawn, the CPU load of the cores never gets through the roof.

Now, I'm pretty new to threading, but my best guess is this is due to the hardware limit of, in this case, 4 cores. The cores get set to work and after that it's just a matter of timeslicing.

Are there any ways to work around this? I'd like to stress all cores as much as possible.

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are you using visual studio express? express version only supports single core applications –  Marius Krämer Feb 17 '12 at 15:20
    
Are these tasks CPU heavy or do they perform IO? How many of these tasks are being spawned at once? What CPU levels are you seeing? –  Gray Feb 17 '12 at 15:21
    
Basically it's a SOA application. We are trying to determine various maxima of the application by simulating users working on it. Your average task would be basic CRUD. Everything is working as expected, I just would like to figure out if its possible to let the 'CPU do more'. –  fuaaark Feb 20 '12 at 14:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

VS2010 has a pretty good Load Test functionality. One of my co-workers wrote a blog post on simulationg multiple users here. The basis for this is to write a few unit tests around the most common operations your users perform and then let the VS Load Test do the multi user work for you.

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The test code I use is below.

It creates a thread for each CPU reported on the system, and has each thread spin unless you throttle it back.

The loadLevel variable is typically set by a scroll bar which has a range 0..100.

Thread[] cpuLoadThread;
public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    cpuLoadThread = new Thread[Environment.ProcessorCount];

    for(int i = 0; i < cpuLoadThread.Length; i++)
    {
        cpuLoadThread[i] = new Thread(new ThreadStart(cpuLoadProc));

        cpuLoadThread[i].IsBackground = true;
        cpuLoadThread[i].Name = "CPU Load Thread";
        cpuLoadThread[i].Start();
    }

}


void cpuLoadProc()
{
    System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch stopWatch = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    stopWatch.Start();

    while (true)
    {
        if (stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds > loadLevel)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(100 - loadLevel);
            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
        }
    }
}
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CPU has not that much to do other than waiting for I/O operations to complete in your threads.

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1  
There's no mention of IO operations in the worker threads. –  Gray Feb 17 '12 at 15:26
    
What do you do in the threads then which would be CPU intensive? –  BlueM Feb 17 '12 at 15:27
    
I don't know. I didn't ask the question. I'm just pointing out that there was no mention of the user tasks being I/O bound. –  Gray Feb 17 '12 at 15:30
    
What he describes are simulated clients which wait for the server to respond. Thats how I interpreted it. So clients don't do much rather than waiting for responses. –  BlueM Feb 20 '12 at 17:58

This is all depend on the OS scheduling algorithm and CLR (as it hides some low level details). In order to allow multiple threads to run OS slice processor time between all the threads and interrupts.

This code should stress it enough for your test, if it doesn't you may need to select C++ or C

int nCores = 4;
for (int i = 0; i < nCores;i++ )
{
    var t = new Thread(() =>
                        {
                            while (true)
                            {
                            }
                        });
    t.Priority = ThreadPriority.Highest;
    t.Start();
}
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