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I'd need to write a class with an overloaded operator [] which has different behavior when the operator [] is used to read or write data. To give a practical example of what I want to achieve, let's say I have to write the implementation of a class named PhoneBook which can be used in the following way:

PhoneBook phoneBook(999999); // 999999 is the default number which should be
                             // used when calling someone who is not in the phone book

phoneBook["Paul"] = 234657;  // adds Paul's number
phoneBook["John"] = 340156;  // adds John's number

// next line should print Paul's number 234657
cout << "To call Paul dial " << phoneBook["Paul"] << endl;
// next line should print John's number 340156
cout << "To call John dial " << phoneBook["John"] << endl;
// next line should print 999999 because Frank is not in the phone book
cout << "To call Frank dial " << phoneBook["Frank"] << endl;

The problem is in the fact that when using

phoneBook["Frank"]

I don't want to add an entry in the phone book for Frank, otherwise a solution based on std::map would be easy to implement.

I did not find on the web any standard way to achieve this so after some thinking I came up with the following solution in which the operator [] returns a "temporary object" named PhoneNumber. PhoneNumber is then used to distinguish between read/write operations:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

class PhoneBook{
private:
    map<string, int> data_; // stores phone numbers
    int defaultNumber_; // default number returned when no matching name is found

public:
    PhoneBook(int defaultNumber) :
        defaultNumber_(defaultNumber) {}

    // Searches in the phone book for a name. If the name is found it returns
    // the corresponding number. If the name is not found it returns defaultNumber_
    int read(string name){
        map<string, int>::iterator it = data_.find(name);
        if (it==data_.end()){
            return defaultNumber_;
        } else {
            return it->second;
        }
    }

    // Forwarding function to map operator []. It is not really necessary but it is added for clarity
    int& write(string name){
        return data_[name];
    }

    // Forward declaration of the "temporary object" returned by operator []
    // See declaration below
    class PhoneNumber;

    PhoneNumber operator[](string name){
        return PhoneNumber(this, name);
    }

    class PhoneNumber{
        friend class PhoneBook;
    private:
        PhoneBook* const phoneBook_;
        string name_;

        // Constructors are private so that PhoneNumber can be used only by PhoneBook
        // Default constructor should not be used
        PhoneNumber() :
            phoneBook_(NULL) {}

        PhoneNumber(PhoneBook* phoneBook, string name) :
            phoneBook_(phoneBook), name_(name) {}

    public:
        // conversion to int for read operations
        operator int (){
            return phoneBook_->read(name_);
            }

        // assignment operator for write operations
        const int& operator = (const int& val){
            return phoneBook_->write(name_) = val;
        }
    };
};

int main(){
    PhoneBook phoneBook(999999);

    phoneBook["Paul"] = 234657;
    phoneBook["John"] = 340156;

    cout << "To call Paul dial " << phoneBook["Paul"] << endl;
    cout << "To call John dial " << phoneBook["John"] << endl;
    cout << "To call Frank dial " << phoneBook["Frank"] << endl;

    return 0;
}

The class PhoneBook behaves like I would like and the program prints:

To call Paul dial 234657
To call John dial 340156
To call Frank dial 999999

I would like to ask you some questions:

  1. Is there any better way to obtain a class behaving like the class I coded?
  2. Has the technique I'm using a name so that I can search more info about it?
  3. Do you see any drawback/possible improvement in my solution?

In the library I'm writing, enabling the behavior I obtained for PhoneBook::operator[] in a similar situation is really important and I would really like to know what you think about my problem.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
+1. Sort of good question and attempted answer. – Nawaz Feb 17 '12 at 15:24
    
This is the C++ solution, I can't think of any better. Just to add some information, C# is a language that would allow you to change the behavior of the get and set operations of the operator[]. (csharp-station.com/Tutorials/Lesson18.aspx). – Léo Feb 17 '12 at 16:03
up vote 8 down vote accepted

What you propose is the standard solution to this problem. It's usually known as the proxy pattern or proxy idiom, and the helper class that you return is called a proxy. (Since it is a nested class, simply calling it Proxy is generally sufficient.)

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't realize what I'm using is a proxy. Maybe it is because I have never seen a proxy used this way...Thanks – carlo Feb 17 '12 at 15:54

I think you may implement two versions of operator [], one with const modifier and the other without. Then if you has a object say PhoneBook phoneBook(999999);, the if phoneBook is const object, only operator [] const can be called. If phoneBook is non-const object, default operator [] is called. If you want to call operator [] const given a non-const object, you may add a cast like static_cast<const PhoneBook&>(phoneBook)->operator[...].

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

class PhoneBook{
private:
    map<string, int> data_; // stores phone numbers
    int defaultNumber_; // default number returned when no matching name is found

public:
    PhoneBook(int defaultNumber) :
        defaultNumber_(defaultNumber) {}
    int operator [] (const string& name) const
    {
        map<string, int>::const_iterator it = data_.find(name);
        if (it == data_.end())
        {
            return defaultNumber_;
        }
        else
        {
            return it->second;
        }
    }
    int& operator [] (const string& name)
    {
        return data_[name];
    }
};

int main(){
    PhoneBook phoneBook(999999);

    phoneBook["Paul"] = 234657;
    phoneBook["John"] = 340156;

    cout << "To call Paul dial " << phoneBook["Paul"] << endl;
    cout << "To call John dial " << phoneBook["John"] << endl;
    cout << "To call Frank dial " << static_cast<const PhoneBook&>(phoneBook)["Frank"] << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In general I prefer using static_cast only when necessary. Having two versions of operator[] would be the solution if the const version would be the one selected by default (in this case the compiler should understand automatically if you are writing or reading) – carlo Feb 17 '12 at 16:12
    
this complicates reading from a mutable object however – Mooing Duck Feb 17 '12 at 16:13
    
@carlo: Forgive I misunderstood your purpose in my post. I think what you actually want is: when reading a non-existing number, just return the default number without inserting. For your problem, I think your solution is good enough. We need either store a proxy object in the map or return a proxy object. However, the semantic change of operator [] may confuse users of you lib. For instance, one may assume your class similar to a map and write int& n = phoneBook["Paul"];, which fails to be compiled. – Yun Huang Feb 18 '12 at 8:39
    
@carlo: In addition, you may not call operator [] if you have a const PhoneBook – Yun Huang Feb 18 '12 at 14:51

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