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Here I try to write a program in C++ to find NCR. But I've got a problem in the result. It is not correct. Can you help me find what the mistake is in the program?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int fact(int n){
    if(n==0) return 1;
    if (n>0) return n*fact(n-1);
};

int NCR(int n,int r){
    if(n==r) return 1;
    if (r==0&&n!=0) return 1;
    else return (n*fact(n-1))/fact(n-1)*fact(n-r);
};

int main(){
    int n;  //cout<<"Enter A Digit for n";
    cin>>n;
    int r;
         //cout<<"Enter A Digit for r";
    cin>>r;
    int result=NCR(n,r);
    cout<<result;
    return 0;
}
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2  
Your formula is wrong, it has fact(n-1) in both numerator and denominator (they cancel). –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '12 at 15:32

4 Answers 4

Your formula is totally wrong, it's supposed to be fact(n)/fact(r)/fact(n-r), but that is in turn a very inefficient way to compute it.

See Fast computation of multi-category number of combinations and especially my comments on that question. (Oh, and please reopen that question also so I can answer it properly)

The single-split case is actually very easy to handle:

unsigned nChoosek( unsigned n, unsigned k )
{
    if (k > n) return 0;
    if (k * 2 > n) k = n-k;
    if (k == 0) return 1;

    int result = n;
    for( int i = 2; i <= k; ++i ) {
        result *= (n-i+1);
        result /= i;
    }
    return result;
}

Demo: http://ideone.com/YJFhr

If the result doesn't fit, you can calculate the sum of logarithms and get the number of combinations inexactly as a double. Or use an arbitrary-precision integer library.


I'm putting my solution to the other, closely related question here, because ideone.com has been losing code snippets lately, and the other question is still closed to new answers.

#include <utility>
#include <vector>

std::vector< std::pair<int, int> > factor_table;
void fill_sieve( int n )
{
    factor_table.resize(n+1);
    for( int i = 1; i <= n; ++i )
        factor_table[i] = std::pair<int, int>(i, 1);
    for( int j = 2, j2 = 4; j2 <= n; (j2 += j), (j2 += ++j) ) {
        if (factor_table[j].second == 1) {
            int i = j;
            int ij = j2;
            while (ij <= n) {
                factor_table[ij] = std::pair<int, int>(j, i);
                ++i;
                ij += j;
            }
        }
    }
}

std::vector<unsigned> powers;

template<int dir>
void factor( int num )
{
    while (num != 1) {
        powers[factor_table[num].first] += dir;
        num = factor_table[num].second;
    }
}

template<unsigned N>
void calc_combinations(unsigned (&bin_sizes)[N])
{
    using std::swap;

    powers.resize(0);
    if (N < 2) return;

    unsigned& largest = bin_sizes[0];
    size_t sum = largest;
    for( int bin = 1; bin < N; ++bin ) {
        unsigned& this_bin = bin_sizes[bin];
        sum += this_bin;
        if (this_bin > largest) swap(this_bin, largest);
    }
    fill_sieve(sum);

    powers.resize(sum+1);
    for( unsigned i = largest + 1; i <= sum; ++i ) factor<+1>(i);
    for( unsigned bin = 1; bin < N; ++bin )
        for( unsigned j = 2; j <= bin_sizes[bin]; ++j ) factor<-1>(j);
}

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
int main(void)
{
    unsigned bin_sizes[] = { 8, 1, 18, 19, 10, 10, 7, 18, 7, 2, 16, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 19, 19, 12, 1, 5, 7, 16, 0, 1, 3, 13, 15, 13, 9, 11, 6, 15, 4, 14, 4, 7, 13, 16, 2, 19, 16, 10, 9, 9, 6, 10, 10, 16, 16 };
    calc_combinations(bin_sizes);
    char* sep = "";
    for( unsigned i = 0; i < powers.size(); ++i ) {
        if (powers[i]) {
            std::cout << sep << i;
            sep = " * ";
            if (powers[i] > 1)
                std::cout << "**" << powers[i];
        }
    }
    std::cout << "\n\n";
}
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Use double instead of int.

UPDATE:

Your formula is also wrong. You should use fact(n)/fact(r)/fact(n-r)

share|improve this answer
1  
That won't save a hideously incorrect formula. –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '12 at 15:38
    
Yes! I didn't care to check the formula because using int would also produce wrong results there. –  Pulkit Goyal Feb 17 '12 at 15:40
2  
Even using double is not a very good approach. Try to compute 6000 choose 3. It fits easily in a 32-bit int, but using that formula and doubles will fail miserably. –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '12 at 15:47
    
oops... I meant 600 choose 3 easily fits. 6000 choose 3 actually doesn't. –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '12 at 15:59

the line

else return (n*fact(n-1))/fact(n-1)*fact(n-r);

should be

else return (n*fact(n-1))/(fact(r)*fact(n-r));

or even

else return fact(n)/(fact(r)*fact(n-r));
share|improve this answer
    
You're making some of the same mistakes as the OP... fact(n-r) needs to be a divisor, not a multiplicative factor. –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '12 at 15:39
    
oups, yes of course... Corrected. Thanks! –  Korchkidu Feb 17 '12 at 15:41

A nice way to implement n-choose-k is to base it not on factorial, but on a "rising product" function which is closely related to the factorial.

The rising_product(m, n) multiplies together m * (m + 1) * (m + 2) * ... * n, with rules for handling various corner cases, like n >= m, or n <= 1:

See here for an implementation nCk as well as nPk as a intrinsic functions in an interpreted programming language written in C:

static val rising_product(val m, val n)
{
  val acc;

  if (lt(n, one))
    return one;

  if (ge(m, n))
    return one;

  if (lt(m, one))
    m = one;

  acc = m;

  m = plus(m, one);

  while (le(m, n)) {
    acc = mul(acc, m);
    m = plus(m, one);
  }

  return acc;
}

val n_choose_k(val n, val k)
{
  val top = rising_product(plus(minus(n, k), one), n);
  val bottom = rising_product(one, k);
  return trunc(top, bottom);
}

val n_perm_k(val n, val k)
{
  return rising_product(plus(minus(n, k), one), n);
}

This code doesn't use operators like + and < because it is type generic (the type val represents a value of any kinds, such as various kinds of numbers including "bignum" integers) and because it is written in C (no overloading), and because it is the basis for a Lisp-like language that doesn't have infix syntax.

In spite of that, this n-choose-k implementation has a simple structure that is easy to follow.

Legend: le: less than or equal; ge: greater than or equal; trunc: truncating division; plus: addition, mul: multiplication, one: a val typed constant for the number one.

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