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I have a class MyDummyClass to which I'd like to pass some properties in form of a Lambda expression for a later evaluation. So what I can do something like

public class MyDummyClass<T>
{
    public MyDummyClass(Expression<Func<T, object>> property)
    {
        ...
    }
    ...
}

..and then use that class like new MyDummyClass<Person>(x=>x.Name), right?

But then I'd like to pass not only a single property but a list of properties. So I'd write my class like

public class MyDummyClass<T>
{
    public MyDummyClass(IEnumerable<Expression<Func<T, object>>> properties)
    {
        ...
    }
    ...
}

and I'd like to use it like new MyDummyClass<Person>(new[] { x=>x.Name, x=>x.Surname }) but unfortunately that doesn't work! Instead I have to write

new MyDummyClass<Person>
     (new Expression<Func<Person, object>>[] { x=>x.Name, x=>x.Surname});

But this is a bit awkward to write, isn't it? Of course, using params would work, but this is just a sample out of a more complicated piece of code where using params is not an option. Does anyone have a better option to come out of this??

share|improve this question
3  
Why don't you want to use params ? It's the simplest approach, and it will work without specifying the delegate type. –  Thomas Levesque Feb 17 '12 at 15:51
    
I too vote for params. It will keep the syntax very neat and behind the scenes it uses an array which is what you wanted to do in the first place! –  Umair Feb 17 '12 at 15:52
    
Sure, in this simple example it would, but I took it out of a more complex one where I cannot use params as there are other optional parameters in between which would therefore not work...sadly –  Juri Feb 17 '12 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try:

public class MyDummyClass<T>
{
    public MyDummyClass(Expression<Func<T, object>> expression)
    {
        NewArrayExpression array = expression.Body as NewArrayExpression;
        foreach( object obj in ( IEnumerable<object> )( array.Expressions ) )
        {
            Debug.Write( obj.ToString() );
        }
    }
}

And then you would call it like this:

MyDummyClass<Person> cls = new MyDummyClass<Person>( item => new[] { item.Name, item.Surname } );

The problem is this won't give you the value of the property because no actual Person instance it specified Doing a ToString on "obj" will give you the name of the property. I don't know if this is what you're after, but it maybe a starting point.

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Extracting the property path afterwards is not an issue, I already have that...but thx, your approach could be a possible one. –  Juri Feb 18 '12 at 10:52
    
I think the main benefit of this approach is that passing the properties into the constructor (2nd snippet) has a simplier, less awkward, syntax and which is close to what you mentioned in your orginal post. –  MotoSV Feb 18 '12 at 11:21
    
I have a problem when Person class has properties with different types. For example, it´ll contain a property Age (int). Some help? [Update] using new object[] is right –  fravelgue Sep 27 '12 at 14:19

Try using params instead:

public MyDummyClass(params Expression<Func<T, object>>[] properties)

Then you should be able to do:

var dummy = new DummyClass<Person>(x => x.Name, x => x.Surname);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the edits, I wrote that on the train on my iPhone... –  Trevor Pilley Feb 17 '12 at 22:37
    
Of course, I know that it would work with params, I cannot use it in my specific situation. 'Cause there are some optional params in between and hence it doesn't work... –  Juri Feb 18 '12 at 10:51
    
Very sweet.. just what the dr. ordered!! –  gcoleman0828 Jun 10 '13 at 21:29

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