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I am writing a readme for my github project in the .md format. Is there a way can I test what my readme.md file will look like before committing to github?

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up vote 47 down vote accepted

Many ways: If you're on a Mac, use Mou. If you want to test in a browser, you could try http://dillinger.io/ (which is also an open source project so you could run it locally if you like).

EDIT: I used to link to notepag.es but that seemed down after a while.

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URL is not working – oscar Jan 30 '15 at 5:29
    
updated to new url. Thanks. – three Jan 30 '15 at 21:44

This one has proven reliable for quite some time: http://tmpvar.com/markdown.html

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It was off to a good start but then this one doesn't show horizontal rules...abandoned before further tests. – Ben Feb 12 '14 at 3:02
    
Nice for a quick-check though. – Nikos Alexandris Oct 24 '14 at 10:28

I usually just edit it on the GitHub website directly and click "Preview" just above the editing window.

Perhaps that's a new feature that's been added since this post was made.

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The problem with this solution is that GitHub (so far) shows inline diffs of the changes which makes a preview quite unusable if you want to get an impression of how the changes look like and not what actually changed. – B12Toaster Jan 16 at 12:16

You may want to take a look at this one:

https://github.com/kristjanjansen/md2html

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This is a pretty old question, however since I stumbled upon it while searching the internet maybe my answer is useful to others. I just found a very useful CLI tool for rendering GitHub flavored markdown: grip. It uses GitHub's API, thus renders quite well.

Frankly, the developer of grip, has a more elaborate answer on these very similar questions:

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In the web, use Dillinger. It's awesome.

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Just searching the web gives many heres one: https://stackedit.io/

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I use a locally hosted HTML file to preview GitHub readmes.

I looked at several existing options, but decided to roll my own to meet the following requirements:

  • Single file
  • Locally hosted (intranet) URL
  • No browser extension required
  • No locally hosted server-side processing (for example, no PHP)
  • Lightweight (for example, no jQuery)
  • High fidelity: use GitHub to render the Markdown, and same CSS

I keep local copies of my GitHub repositories in sibling directories under a "github" directory.

Each repo directory contains a README.md file:

.../github/
           repo-a/
                  README.md
           repo-b/
                  README.md
           etc.

The github directory contains the "preview" HTML file:

.../github/
           readme.html

To preview a readme, I browse github/readme.html, specifying the repo in the query string:

http://localhost/github/readme.html?repo-a

Alternatively, you can copy the readme.html into the same directory as the README.md, and omit the query string:

http://localhost/github/repo-a/readme.html

If the readme.html is in the same directory as README.md, you don't even need to serve readme.html over HTTP: you can just open it directly from your file system.

The HTML file uses the GitHub API to render the Markdown in a README.md file. There's a rate limit: at the time of writing, 60 requests per hour.

Works for me in current production versions of Chrome, IE, and Firefox on Windows 7.

Source

Here's the HTML file (readme.html):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<!--
     Preview a GitHub README.md.

     Either:

     -  Copy this file to a directory that contains repo directories,
        and then specify a repo name in the query string.

        For example:

          http://localhost/github/readme.html?myrepo

     or

     -  Copy this file to the directory that contains a README.md,
        and then browse to this file without specifying a query string.

        For example:

          http://localhost/github/myrepo/readme.html

        (or just open this file in your browser directly from
        your file system, without HTTP)
-->
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8"/>
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=Edge"/>
<meta name="author" content="Graham Hannington"/>
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"/>
<title>GitHub readme preview</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://primercss.io/docs.css"/>
<script type="text/javascript">
//<![CDATA[
var HTTP_STATUS_OK = 200;
var URL_API_GITHUB_RENDER_MARKDOWN = "https://api.github.com/markdown/raw";
var README_FILE_NAME = "README.md";

var readmeURL;

var queryString = location.search.substring(1);

if (queryString.length > 0) {
  readmeURL = queryString + "/" + README_FILE_NAME;
} else {
  readmeURL = README_FILE_NAME;
}

// Get Markdown, then render it as HTML
function getThenRenderMarkdown(markdownURL) {
  var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open("GET", markdownURL, true);
  xhr.responseType = "text";
  xhr.onload = function(e) {
    if (this.status == HTTP_STATUS_OK) {
     // Response text contains Markdown
      renderMarkdown(this.responseText);
    }
  }
  xhr.send();
}

// Use the GitHub API to render Markdown as HTML
function renderMarkdown(markdown) {
  var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open("POST", URL_API_GITHUB_RENDER_MARKDOWN, true);
  xhr.responseType = "html";
  xhr.onload = function(e) {
    if (this.status == HTTP_STATUS_OK) {
      document.getElementById("readme").innerHTML = this.response;
    }
  }
  xhr.send(markdown);
}

window.onload = function() {
  getThenRenderMarkdown(readmeURL);
}
//]]>
</script>
</head>
<body>
<header class="masthead">
<div class="container">
<span class="masthead-logo"><span class="mega-octicon
octicon-mark-github"></span>GitHub readme preview</span>
</div>
</header>
<div class="container">
<div id="readme" class="markdown-body">
<p>Rendering markdown, please wait...</p>
</div>
<footer class="footer">Rendering by
<a href="https://developer.github.com/v3/markdown/">GitHub</a>,
styling by <a href="http://primercss.io/">Primer</a>.</footer>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Developer notes

  • Typically, I wrap my code in an IIFE, but in this case, I didn't see the need, and thought I'd keep it concise
  • I haven't bothered supporting backlevel IE
  • For conciseness, I have omitted the error handling code (do you believe me?!)
  • I'd welcome JavaScript programming tips

Ideas

  • I'm considering creating a GitHub repository for this HTML file, and putting the file in the gh-pages branch, so that GitHub serves it as a "normal" web page. I'd tweak the file to accept a complete URL - of the README (or any other Markdown file) - as the query string. I'm curious to see whether being hosted by GitHub would sidestep the GitHub API request limit, and whether I run afoul of cross-domain issues (using an Ajax request to get the Markdown from a different domain than the domain serving the HTML page).

Original version (deprecated)

I've preserved this record of the original version for curiosity value. This version had the following issues that are solved in the current version:

  • It required some related files to be downloaded
  • It didn't support being dropped into the same directory as the README.md
  • Its HTML was more brittle; more susceptible to changes in GitHub

The github directory contains the "preview" HTML file and related files:

.../github/
           readme-preview.html
           github.css
           github2.css
           octicons.eot
           octicons.svg
           octicons.woff

I downloaded the CSS and octicons font files from GitHub:

https://assets-cdn.github.com/assets/github- ... .css
https://assets-cdn.github.com/assets/github2- ... .css
https://github.com/static/fonts/octicons/octicons.* (eot, woff, svg)

I renamed the CSS files to omit the long string of hex digits in the original names.

I edited github.css to refer to the local copies of the octicons font files.

I examined the HTML of a GitHub page, and reproduced enough of the HTML structure surrounding the readme content to provide reasonable fidelity; for example, the constrained width.

The GitHub CSS, octicons font, and HTML "container" for the readme content are moving targets: I will need to periodically download new versions.

I toyed with using CSS from various GitHub projects. For example:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"
      href="http://rawgit.com/sindresorhus/github-markdown-css/gh-pages/github-markdown.css">

but eventually decided to use the CSS from GitHub itself.

Source

Here's the HTML file (readme-preview.html):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<!-- Preview a GitHub README.md.
     Copy this file to a directory that contains repo directories.
     Specify a repo name in the query string. For example:

     http://localhost/github/readme-preview.html?myrepo
-->
<html>
<head>
<title>Preview GitHub readme</title>
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=Edge"/>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<!-- Downloaded copies of the CSS files served by GitHub.
     In github.css, the @font-face for font-family:'octicons'
     has been edited to refer to local copies of the font files -->
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="github.css"/>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="github2.css"/>
<style>
body {
  margin-top: 1em;
}
</style>
<script type="text/javascript">
//<![CDATA[
var HTTP_STATUS_OK = 200;
var URL_API_GITHUB_RENDER_MARKDOWN = "https://api.github.com/markdown/raw";
var README_FILE_NAME = "README.md";

var repo = location.search.substring(1);

// Get Markdown, then render it as HTML
function getThenRenderMarkdown() {
  var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open("GET", repo + "/" + README_FILE_NAME, true);
  xhr.responseType = "text";
  xhr.onload = function(e) {
    if (this.status == HTTP_STATUS_OK) {
     // Response text contains Markdown
      renderMarkdown(this.responseText);
    }
  }
  xhr.send();
}

// Use the GitHub API to render Markdown as HTML
function renderMarkdown(markdown) {
  var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open("POST", URL_API_GITHUB_RENDER_MARKDOWN, true);
  xhr.responseType = "html";
  xhr.onload = function(e) {
    if (this.status == HTTP_STATUS_OK) {
      document.getElementById("readme-content").innerHTML = this.response;
    }
  }
  xhr.send(markdown);
}

window.onload = getThenRenderMarkdown;
//]]>
</script>
</head>
<body>
<!-- The following HTML structure was copied from live GitHub page on 2015-12-01,
     except for the "readme-content" id of the article element,
     which was coined for this preview page.-->
<div class="main-content" role="main">
<div class="container repo-container new-discussion-timeline experiment-repo-nav">
<div class="repository-content">
<div id="readme" class="boxed-group flush clearfix announce instapaper_body md">
<h3><span class="octicon octicon-book"></span>README.md</h3>
<article class="markdown-body entry-content"
         itemprop="mainContentOfPage"
         id="readme-content"><p>Rendering markdown...</p></article>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
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