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I have a webpage looks something like this:

<html>
...
<div id="menu">
...
  <ul id="listOfItems">
  <!--- repeated block start -->
    <li id="item" class="itemClass">
    ...
    <span class="spanClass"><span class="title">title</span></span>
    ...
    </li>
  <!-- repeated block end-->
    <li id="item" class="itemClass">
    ...
    <span class="spanClass"><span class="title">title something</span></span>
    ...
    </li>
    <li id="item" class="itemClass">
    ...
    <span class="spanClass"><span class="title">title other thing</span></span>
    ...
   </li>
 </ul>
 ...
 </div>
 ...
 </html>

I would like to know what is the xpath of the titles ("title", "title something", "title other thing"). The point is that the order of the <li> elements are not specified. It could be different after every page loading. Is there any method how to discover a certain structure of the page with xpath? I have an notion about how to solve this issue, but before I'm going to write iterations with C# to discover the page I ask you.

Thanks in advance!

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1  
On the java driver api, there's a driver.findElements(By.xpath("//div//span[contains(@class, 'title')) that would work for this. Hopefully the C# API is similar. –  ccoakley Feb 17 '12 at 16:05
    
And only 2 hours later do I notice that my braces and quotes don't close properly: driver.findElements(By.xpath("//div[@id='menu']//span[contains(@class, 'title')]")). I prefer to use contains for css classes (though you should probably normalize the whitespace if you do) in case you add classes dynamically. I also try to select elements under something with a definitive id (either the menu div or the listOfItems ul) just to reduce bad matches. –  ccoakley Feb 17 '12 at 18:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does Selenium support XPath expressions like:

//span[@class='title']

If yes, than use the above XPath expression. It selects every span element in the XML document, whose class attribute has string value of "title".

I recommend to use a tool like the XPath Visualizer to play with different XPath expressions and see the selected nodes highlighted in the source XML document.

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1  
It is not recommended to use @class='title' unless you are absolutely certain the element you're looking for will always have just a single class. Instead I recommend you use //span[contains(@class,'title')]. Also, to answer your question, yes Selenium does support XPath expressions like the one you posted :) –  ohaal Feb 17 '12 at 16:22
    
And if you have any input into the page production insist on the development convention that different element 'types' have unique identifiers. –  Martin Spamer Feb 17 '12 at 16:39
    
@ohaal: Yes, I don't need to be reminded about what the value of a class attribute may be. My solution solves the concrete problem that the author poses here -- it intentionally doesn't generalize, so that to focus on the concrete problem and not to distract the OP with potential generalizations. –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 17 '12 at 18:25
    
@Martin Spamer: I don't understand your comment and how it relates to the current question -- could you, please, elaborate? –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 17 '12 at 18:26
1  
@RossPatterson: Yes, and if the sample XML contained such class attributes, I would definitely recommend exactly such answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 18 '12 at 3:15

First of all, id's should be unique, so your portrayed webpage would not work well when it comes to testing.

I did however test, and got some XPath locators to work for selecting specific titles (although I recommend you fix your webpage instead of actually using this):

//li[@id='item']/span/span
//li[@id='item'][1]/span/span
//li[@id='item'][3]/span/span

If you're after all three titles, you could try Dimitre Novatchev's suggestion:

//span[@class='title']

This should get all titles on the page.

I would like to say one thing however, if you're getting into Selenium, I recommend you download the Selenium IDE extension for Firefox. It's a great tool for beginners. It helps you both to make your Selenium tests by recording your clicks on a website, and it also helps you auto-generate and test your XPath locators and other locators.

And again: I urge you to not make a website with duplicate id elements :-)

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