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In looking at the MySQL documentation, I am not finding an option under DATE_FORMAT (referenced by TIME_FORMAT) for converting a MySQL TIME value (ex: 172:04:11) to something like, "7 days, 4 hours".

Is there a way (in MySQL) to format time in this manner? Or should I just operate on the returned TIME value in PHP?

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Might be easier to just use TIME_TO_SEC to return the total seconds then just have PHP easily figure out the number of days and hours. –  Aaron W. Feb 17 '12 at 16:54
    
@aaron-w., I eventually came to this conclusion. Sucks that MySQL truncates TIME stamps at 838:59:59. There shouldn't be a limitation IMHO. Anyway -- I'm using TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND,date_old,date_newer) to get the seconds. –  a coder Feb 22 '12 at 21:49

3 Answers 3

A variable of TIME type would be most probably used to represent a time interval, and you can use addtime() function to add this interval to a given DATETIME type variable.

SELECT ADDTIME( NOW(), '172:04:11' );

works as expected, however if you need to display this time interval as days and hours simply use:

SELECT CONCAT( 
  FLOOR(HOUR('172:04:11')/24), 
  ' days, ',
  HOUR('172:04:11') MOD 24, 
  ' hours.');
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this works on timestamps up to 838:59:59. MySQL truncates TIME values greater than that. –  a coder Feb 22 '12 at 21:53
SELECT CONCAT( FLOOR(TIME_FORMAT('172:04:11', '%H')/24), ' days ', (TIME_FORMAT('172:04:11', '%H') MOD 24),   ' hours ', TIME_FORMAT('172:04:11', '%i'), ' minutes ', TIME_FORMAT('172:04:11', '%s'), ' seconds')
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this only works on timestamps up to 838:59:59. MySQL truncates TIME values greater than that. Try using 999:59:59... then 1999:59:59... both return 34 days, 22 hours, 59 minutes, 59 seconds. –  a coder Apr 12 '12 at 19:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I hate having to answer my own question, but to clear things up MySQL's TIME() function truncates values over 838:59:59 - obviously not desirable.

The solution I found was to use this:

TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND,date_old,date_newer) 

Which does not have the same truncation problem. Once you have the seconds use some server side scripting to format the time as in my original request. Reply if you want to see an example in PHP, or write your own. :)

Hope this is helpful?

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