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I have this code:

$sql = "SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 LIMIT 0, 30 ";       
$result = mysql_query($sql);

// After this I need to run second query which is not available in first query. Help me with this please.
$sql2 = "SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 AND `id` = not available in first query, how to do that? LIMIT 0, 30 ";         
$result = mysql_query($sql);

// I can then echo my first query result here 
// I can then echo my second query result here 

What I need to do is to check the first result to run the second query. I set the limit on purpose. For example if the id from 1 to 30 is available in first query. The second query will query id for example starting from 31 to 60.

I hope you can understand what I'm trying to say. Thanks in advance.

UPDATE: I need to make dig lookup with the query result. The query result is nameserver. Because dig response speed is random so I was thinking I want to split for example: 30 result from 90 nameserver and run 3 simultaneous dig lookup. So thats why the second query (nameserver) result should not available in the first query result and the third query result should not available in the second query result. I need to use all 3 result for later use. I realy appreciate your response. Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Is there any particular reason you need to limit the size of the result sets? – ChrisPatrick Feb 17 '12 at 16:46
    
@ChrisPatrick: I update my question. – sg552 Feb 17 '12 at 16:55
1  
If you are doing them simultaneously could you not do 1 big query of 90 results and then use PHP to split them up into the various dig lookups? (Thus meaning you only have to do a single SQL query) – ChrisPatrick Feb 17 '12 at 17:04

You can just change the LIMIT criteria. There's an "OFFSET" option (which you've specified as 0 in your first query). Using your examples the following would suffice.

$sql = "SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 LIMIT 0, 30 ";       
$result = mysql_query($sql);

// After this I need to run second query which is not available in first query. Help me with this please.
$sql2 = "SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 LIMIT 30, 30 ";         
$result = mysql_query($sql);

The second query will start at offset by 30 and return 30 more rows, so in this case rows 31-60

edit Based on your updated question, a more sensible approach would be to simply do

$sql = "SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 LIMIT 0, 90 ";       
$result = mysql_query($sql);

And then have PHP split up the rows into requests to separate servers as required thus ensuring there are no duplicates and reducing back and forth between PHP and MySQL.

share|improve this answer
    
How did this answer get an upvote but not mine when I answered the same thing 3 minutes earlier? – Ben Lee Feb 17 '12 at 16:49
    
Yours was much shorter and edited 3 minutes after this was posted. Originally yours only had the line specifying LIMIT 30,30. – Simon at mso.net Feb 17 '12 at 16:50
    
No, it also had an explanation right after that code snippet about the offset. – Ben Lee Feb 17 '12 at 16:52
    
My edit 3 minutes after your answer was just adding in the alternate explanation using a sub-query in case the question author meant that and just used poor example queries. – Ben Lee Feb 17 '12 at 16:52
    
Good edit, I think. XD – ChrisPatrick Feb 17 '12 at 17:09

If you just need to grab the next 30 rows, why not just:

LIMIT 30, 30

On the second query?

See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/select.html#id838627 regarding LIMIT:

With two arguments, the first argument specifies the offset of the first row to return, and the second specifies the maximum number of rows to return.

Note that this can also be written as LIMIT 30 OFFSET 30 if you want to be more clear. So:

$sql = "SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 LIMIT 30 OFFSET 30";
$result = mysql_query($sql);

If your ids/queries were just examples, and what you really need is a query that selects from a set that excludes the result set from a different query, then you can use a sub-query like this:

SELECT ns, id
FROM `dns`
WHERE `ns` = 1
AND `id` NOT IN (
    SELECT `id`
    FROM `dns`
    WHERE `ns` = 1
    LIMIT 0, 30
)
LIMIT 0, 30

First the inner sub-query will run and return a list of ids. That set of ids will be explicitly excluded from the outer query because we specify NOT IN (...).

share|improve this answer
    
Your second query results in the same problem seen in ChrisPatrick's suggestion in that 2 queries are being executed where one would suffice. – Simon at mso.net Feb 17 '12 at 16:51
    
@Simonatmso.net, in this example yes. But maybe the question author just used bad example queries and actually needed two different queries where the second excludes ids from the first. If they are the same query then yes, the first method is better, which is why I put it first.... – Ben Lee Feb 17 '12 at 16:54
    
Which yours is not doing, it's performing a second query which in most cases would probably have the same results but it is not guarenteed. If needing to explicitly exclude the original result rows, you should use that query object to specify which ids to exclude. Else the limit offset would suffice. – Simon at mso.net Feb 17 '12 at 16:55
    
@Simonatmso.net, it's just an example to show the structure. The question author did ask for how to write a query that excludes the results from another. I figured I'd both answer the literal question (sub-query) and answer with what I believe may be a better solution (altering the limit) – Ben Lee Feb 17 '12 at 16:59

Use NOT IN with a subquery, like so:

SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 AND `id` NOT IN 
(SELECT ns, id FROM `dns` WHERE `ns` = 1 LIMIT 0, 30) 
LIMIT 0, 30
share|improve this answer
    
This option would result in a superfluous second query. On a small table not a big deal, however if desiring to exclude by id explicitly it may be more accurate/optimal to generate WHERE id NOT IN () clause from the original query resuitset – Simon at mso.net Feb 17 '12 at 16:45

So what's your question?

And why don't you just do a subselect or join?

share|improve this answer

Why not just do the first query without a limit and then extract the first 30 results with a for loop or something.

Saves doing two queries.

So

$query = SELECT ns, id FROM dns WHERE ns = 1
$result = mysql_query($query);

for ($i=0;$i<30;$i++) {
//Do Stuff with mysql_fetch_row...
}

for ($i=0;$i<30;$i++) {
//Do more stuff
}

Unless there is a reason you can't get all the results at once?

EDIT: Althought clearly you could put LIMIT 60 in the query if you definitely only wanted 60 results.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a terrible idea to have mysql select the entire result set and then iterate through only a small portion of it. If you are going to go this route, you'd do "LIMIT 60". Without any limit, you are having mysql do a lot more work and filling up a lot more app memory than is necessary. – Ben Lee Feb 17 '12 at 16:51
    
That depends. I wasn't sure if the question was just an example, it might be that they would want the rest of the results later on. Clearly using LIMIT 60 on this would be sensible if you definitely only wanted a total of 60 results, but to me it wasn't clear whether this would be the case. And since you are probably going to have to do work on the results anyway it made sense to me to do this so you are only doing a single, unnested query. – ChrisPatrick Feb 17 '12 at 16:54

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