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I've seen some documentation and videos from WWDC about data protection in iOS5 and it seems very nice since it can encrypt all your application data and keep it protected as long as your device is locked. However, I see 2 main problems with that system-wide data protection mechanism:

1- if somebody manages to steal my iPhone while it is not locked (which is typically what happens on a "steal-and-run" case), it can potentially plug my iPhone into a laptop and access my data unencrypted

2- it forces me to define a system-wide passcode, which seems natural to some users but is still cumbersome to a lot of users. And it seems abusive that I force my users to define a system-level passcode even though my app is the only one where encryption might really require it. And it's even more abusive as a four-digit password is not such a good protection against brute force attacks.

So my question is the following. Is there any simple way to encrypt my data with a passcode specific to my application, so that every time a user launches the app, they have to enter the passcode, but they don't have to define one on the system level? If not, can I at least plug into standard data protection API's with such an application-specific passcode? If not, is it worth it to write my own encryption layer on top of core data to enable such a scenario? Or is it something that might be added to future versions of iOS (in which case I'll probably stick with system-wide passcodes for now and upgrade it later)?

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Try asking this question on apple.stackexchange.com instead. – sch Feb 17 '12 at 17:44
    
@sch—Why? It’s a programming question. – Noah Witherspoon Feb 17 '12 at 17:57
    
Yes sorry, I didn't understand your question the first time I read it. Though now, I don't really know how I managed to misunderstand it :) – sch Feb 17 '12 at 18:01
    
While I understand your concerns, the question is do your users care about having the data in that particular app encrypted at the app level. – dbrajkovic Feb 17 '12 at 20:44
    
They certainly care a lot about having that data strongly encrypted and protected from any kind of intrusion as it is identity information, and one of the promises of this application is distributed secured storage. So we want to apply the same level of data protection as for a mobile banking app. – Sebastien Feb 18 '12 at 17:12

Several data protection api's on other operating systems (e.g. DPAPI on windows) allow developers to provide supplemental entropy for the key derivation process used to protect the data . On those systems, you could easily derive that data from a pin number. Without that pin, then you can't generate the key and read the data.

I looked and couldn't find anything to this effect on iOS, but I am not an objective c programmer so frankly , reading apple's documentation is a pain for me, and I didn't look too hard.

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