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Suppose I have:

template<typename T>
class A { 
  typedef T t_type;
  void done_work();
};

template<typename T>
class B { 
  typedef T t_type;
  void do_work(){
    // adds work to an asynchronous event queue, eventually T.done_work() is called
  }
};

template<typename T>
class C { 
  typedef T t_type;
  void do_work(){
    // adds work to an asynchronous event queue, eventually T.done_work() is called
  }
};

typedef A<B<A > > a_with_b;
typedef A<C<A > > a_with_C;

void main(int argc, char** argv){
  a_with_b awb;
  a_with_c awc;
}

How do I resolve the typedef a_with_b?

I want to do this because A has a callback to B, and B has a callback to A. For example, A would call B.do_work(), and eventually B would call A.done_work(). Furthermore, these are each asynchronous calls, so I cannot simply call B.do_work() and wait until B returns "done" because A has other important work to do in the meantime.

The reason I can't just have A take a reference to B is because there can be other implementations that replace B, such as C.

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I want them to depend on each other, but avoid the problem where it ends up being A<B<A<B<A<B<A<B ... > > ... > >. –  Andrew Hundt Feb 17 '12 at 18:50
6  
Can you expand regarding the use-case? Possibly the underlying problem can be approached differently. –  Georg Fritzsche Feb 17 '12 at 18:52
2  
You don't need a is-a relationship to do what you describe. If A has a reference to B and B has a reference to A, you can easily do your callback. –  Mark Ransom Feb 17 '12 at 18:55
1  
It looks like A should be a template, but why should B and C? –  ildjarn Feb 17 '12 at 19:04
    
The A is a template. It should be used with a parameter. –  Tim Kachko Feb 17 '12 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I want to do this because A has a callback to B, and B has a callback to A. For example, A would call B.do_work(), and eventually B would call A.done_work().

Ideally you'd avoid the interdepencies in the first place, e.g.:

template<class T> struct A {
    std::function<void (T)> handler;
    void f(T) {}
    void work() { handler(T()); }
};
template<class T> struct B {
    std::function<void (T)> fn;
    void f(T) {}
    void work() { handler(T()); }
};

// ..
A<int> a;
B<int> b;
a.handler = std::bind(&B::f, &b);
b.handler = std::bind(&A::f, &a);
share|improve this answer
    
A separately defined completion handler works around the problem. Thanks! –  Andrew Hundt Feb 17 '12 at 19:17

You can't.

At least one of them must not be a template in your case.

Are you sure you need template in this case? If the two classes A and B or A and C are so tightly coupled that one explicitly references another, that seems clearly a case where templates should not be used on classes B and C, because you couldn't specialize any of those class with something else without breaking your whole callback magic.

By the way, a callback library like sigc++ might be what you need.

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