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I'm building a windows service application which has a configuration to compile it as a basic windows application. The main project file for the exe includes conditionals which determine whether the project is being compiled as a service application or as a windows forms application.

The problem is, when I do something which makes the project code change, the code gets destroyed and broken. For example, a line which says Application.Initialize; becomes AppliApplication.Initialize; and the line which has {$R *.RES} gets cut down to S}, and most of my conditionals get deleted.

I'm wondering if there is a way to overcome this issue, if there are any tricks, or if I just have to grin and bear it?

Here's the file below as I would like it to stay...

program JDRMServer;

uses
{$IFDEF TESTAPP}
  FastMM4,
  Vcl.Forms,
{$ELSE}
  Vcl.SvcMgr,
{$ENDIF TESTAPP}
  uJDRMServer in 'uJDRMServer.pas' {JDRMSvr: TService},
  uJDRMSessions in 'uJDRMSessions.pas',
  uJDRMSvrCli in 'uJDRMSvrCli.pas',
  uJDRMSvrDsh in 'uJDRMSvrDsh.pas',
  JDDB in 'JDDB.pas',
  uJDRMServerTEST in 'uJDRMServerTEST.pas' {JDRMSvrTest},
  uJDRMServerThread in 'uJDRMServerThread.pas',
  uJDRMSvrMessages in 'uJDRMSvrMessages.pas';

{$R *.RES}

begin

{$IFDEF TESTAPP}
  Application.Initialize;
  Application.MainFormOnTaskbar := True;
  Application.CreateForm(TJDRMSvrTest, JDRMSvrTest);
{$ELSE}
  if (not Application.DelayInitialize) or (Application.Installing) then
    Application.Initialize;
  Application.CreateForm(TJDRMSvr, JDRMSvr);
{$ENDIF TESTAPP}
  Application.Run;
end.
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Whilst I think I know what your question is, I can't see anywhere where you explicitly state a question. –  David Heffernan Feb 17 '12 at 19:30
    
It's a bit odd that you switch between service and GUI app with a conditional. Switching between service and hidden standard app would make more sense. And in that case the switch would be better as a command line argument. Is the GUI app the interface to your service? If so then a separate project would seem more natural. –  David Heffernan Feb 17 '12 at 20:13
    
There's both a VCL form and a Service data module. Depending on the build configuration (I have 3), one config will declare "TestApp" where I can in turn use conditionals to identify whether to compile it as a service or as a VCL app. They don't use each other at all. TJDRMSvr is the service data module, and TJDRMSvrTest is the app form. The app is designed with some start/stop and logging capabilities so I can view logs in real-time rather than opening/refreshing a log file, and I can start/stop the worker thread (separate) as needed. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 17 '12 at 20:49
    
Separate project is really the way to go. –  David Heffernan Feb 17 '12 at 21:03
    
There is nothing you can do, IDE wants to own main project source module. –  OnTheFly Feb 18 '12 at 0:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As David says, you are stuck with the IDE believing the dpr is its own private backyard. The easiest solution is to just have everything in a separate unit and remove the conditionals from the dpr's uses clause. FastMM will come in handy in your service version as well as in your test app anyway and the distinction between vcl.forms and vcl.svcMgr can be made in that separate unit.

dpr would be reduced to:

uses
  FastMM4,
  YourAppMain,
  uJDRMServer,
  uJDRMSessions,
  uJDRMSvrCli in 'uJDRMSvrCli.pas',
  uJDRMSvrDsh in 'uJDRMSvrDsh.pas',
  JDDB in 'JDDB.pas',
  uJDRMServerTEST in 'uJDRMServerTEST.pas' {JDRMSvrTest},
  uJDRMServerThread in 'uJDRMServerThread.pas',
  uJDRMSvrMessages in 'uJDRMSvrMessages.pas';

{$R *.RES}

begin
  YourAppMain.Execute;
end;

And your main application unit would take the rest of the code from the dpr:

unit YourAppMain;

interface

procedure Execute;

implementation

uses
{$IFDEF TESTAPP}
  Vcl.Forms,
{$ELSE}
  Vcl.SvcMgr,
{$ENDIF TESTAPP}
  OtherUnits;

procedure Execute;
begin
{$IFDEF TESTAPP}
  Application.Initialize;
  Application.MainFormOnTaskbar := True;
  Application.CreateForm(TJDRMSvrTest, JDRMSvrTest);
{$ELSE}
  if (not Application.DelayInitialize) or (Application.Installing) then
    Application.Initialize;
  Application.CreateForm(TJDRMSvr, JDRMSvr);
{$ENDIF TESTAPP}
  Application.Run;
end;

end.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 If you can do it this way then it's the solution, but there are times when you can't. For example when you want to switch memory managers on a conditional. –  David Heffernan Feb 17 '12 at 19:46
    
@DavidHeffernan: yes, the memory manager or any other "I need to be first" unit that needs to be included conditionally would indeed mean that you would have to rely on your source control to keep your dpr "sane". –  Marjan Venema Feb 17 '12 at 19:48
    
I don't know what happened - like a day or two ago I upvoted, accepted, and commented on this answer. Now it's as if I never did anything. Re-accepted :D –  Jerry Dodge Feb 19 '12 at 21:43
    
@JerryDodge: :-) It's called a crooked volt in your computer. Luckily you can blame it for almost anything... –  Marjan Venema Feb 20 '12 at 7:13

The simple answer is to just create a different project and use that as the standalone version. This is what I do with my services, and it means you can use other conditionals to suit each mode.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yes, this works and is what I did initially too, but it became a hassle there too because every change I did I had to make in two different project files (adding/removing units, etc.). I also intend to add more code to the project file, meaning code which would have to be duplicated. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 17 '12 at 20:46
    
It's only duplicated if you fail to move the duplicate code into a separate unit where it can be called by the two .dpr files. –  David Heffernan Feb 17 '12 at 21:03

Yes, the IDE does that and always has done. There is no known way to stop it behaving like that. You are just going to have to suck it up.

I have similar conditionals and the way I deal with them is to use my revision control system to help me, at commit time, undo the changes that the IDE makes. So whenever I check in a .dpr file I review the differences and revert the bogus ones.

I also try to add and remove units from the project by editing the .dpr file rather than letting the IDE do it. This tends to reduce the incidence rate of the bogus mods.

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