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I've just done the following thing with Git but I am not sure if it's the right way of doing things. What I have is a file that has some stuff. Then there is a branch that adds extra stuff to this file (extends it, it's a plugin we sell separately). Let's say branch1 and branch2 have a file with the following content:

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branch1
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123

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branch2
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123
qwe
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Then I did some work on a major feature in branch1 and made a commit to that branch. After that I merged branch1 into branch2 to re-apply this new feature to the plugin version of the file as well. Now the files are

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branch1
-----------
1234

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branch2
-----------
1234
qwe
-----------

But the code doesn't completely work and I now need to switch to branch2 and do some changes to the code that extends the file there (change "qwe" to "qwer"). However while working I am also finding some mistakes in the base code ("1234") and fix them (change "1234" to "12345"). Now my working directory with the HEAD being in branch2 has the following

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branch2 (working directory)
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12345
qwer
-----------

Now I need to commit this, the result I am aiming for is

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branch1
-----------
12345

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branch2
-----------
12345
qwer
-----------

I fear that if I just commit this to branch2 and then will separately reapply the 1234->12345 change to branch1 and commit that too, this will yield the results I am looking for but Git will recognize this as two separate and fully independent commits and when I'll be going through a similar process in future (e.g. 12345->123456 in branch1 and then branch1->branch2 merge), I'll get a conflict in that place. So my solution is to use interactive staging to commit only qwe->qwer change to branch2. Then stash the remaining changes (otherwise it won't allow to switch back to branch1), switch to the other branch, apply stash, commit 1234->12345 to branch1 and finally merge branch1->branch2.

That did the trick however since I am relatively new to Git I am not very sure if I am using things right and in the best possible way. Please let me know if the above makes sense and if it doesn't please tell me a better way of doing that.

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3 Answers

Your approach seems reasonable to me. I would do it differently, however:

  1. As soon as I see the mistakes in the base code, stash and switch to branch1, and fix them there. Test, polish, commit.

  2. Throw out the old merge of branch1 into branch2 and redo it with the fixes from step 1 (I understand that for manual merges git-rerere can reduce the duplicated work, but I've never used it), or just merge again and live with a slightly messier history.

This ensures that the "mistake fixes" are in fact appropriate for branch1 and not subtly broken outside of the branch2 code, and that they are the same in both branches.

On the other hand, the “don't do that” answer: it's bad software architecture for a “plugin” to require modifying the main program code; that makes it not really a plugin. If you fix this, then the main program and the plugin become independent trees (as far as your use of Git is concerned) and no merging is required (though updates for compatibility, as in your qwe→qwer , are still possibly needed).

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You can use interactive add (git add -p) to stage the 'qwer' change and commit it to branch2, but instead of using:

git stash
git checkout branch1
git stash pop

you can:

git checkout -m branch1

which transfers your changes into the working tree for branch1 and saves you a few git commands

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We use a release candidate branch to put together different features. Rerere is something you want to lean on. Read further here:

http://dymitruk.com/blog/2012/02/05/branch-per-feature/

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