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Maybe I am being stupid, but this isn't making sense to me... I have a hash built from reading unique codes and error codes from numerous files. When I try to print out the key=value pairs, the keys are not appearing unless immediately followed by a newline.

Here's the code:

foreach my $key (keys %codehash){
    print "Key: $key\tValue: $codehash{$key}\n";
    print "Key: $key\n";
    print "Value: $codehash{$key}\n";
    print "\n\n";
}

Here's the output:

         Value: NoParamSpecified
    Key: 016C
    Value: NoParamSpecified


        Value: billingAddress.firstName.lengthLong
    Key: 003M
    Value: billingAddress.firstName.lengthLong


         Value: billingAddress.address1.lengthLong
    Key: 0041
    Value: billingAddress.address1.lengthLong

Notice that it is not even printing the "Key: " plain text from the first statement, just the tab and beyond. I have never come across this before.

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2  
Post the hex dump of the output please. –  Sinan Ünür Feb 17 '12 at 19:25
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The behavior is consistent with all the keys containing a "\r" at the end. The hex dump will confirm this.

Another way to confirm this would be to run a suitable regex substitution over the keys before printing it out:

$key =~ s/\s+$//;
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Are you reading from files generated on Windows? Are you using chop instead of chomp or s/\s+$//? –  mob Feb 17 '12 at 20:05
    
Turns out the data files were a combination of DOS-based and Unix-based. I applied the regex to the key/value variable prior to adding to the hash and now everything is working properly. As I attributed at the beginning of the post, it was me being stupid. Thanks everyone! –  Mark H Krause Feb 17 '12 at 21:08
    
\z should be \s? (which really fixes the problem rather than confirming it) –  ikegami Feb 17 '12 at 22:10
    
@ikegami : Right you are –  Zaid Feb 18 '12 at 7:18
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I'm going to bet that because you're reading in data that somewhere the data contains formatting characters and you're including them in key data (which is bad if the formatting characters are doing things like "go back to the beginning of the line", etc).

To get around this, try printing the key in base64 or hex and I bet you'll see it's a much longer string than you thought it was.

use MIME::Base64;
# ...
print "Key: " . encode_base64($key) . "\tValue: $codehash{$key}\n";
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Well, the keys are only 4 alphanumeric characters so I doubt I'm running into formatting characters. Here's the output from your suggestion: Key: MDA0MQ0= Value: billingAddress.address1.lengthLong Key: 0041 Value: billingAddress.address1.lengthLong –  Mark H Krause Feb 17 '12 at 19:33
    
@MarkHKrause, that output indicates that the first key ends with a "\r" character, which causes the cursor to return to the first column, and the remaining output then overwrites the key. (This would have been more obvious if Wes had suggested unpack('H*', $key) instead of Base64.) –  cjm Feb 17 '12 at 19:57
    
You're right, unpack would have been a better choice. –  Wes Hardaker Feb 17 '12 at 20:14
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This is part of the terminal I/O. It only prints at the end of a line. Set the output autoflush to get it to print after every print statement:

foreach my $key (keys %codehash){
    local $| = 1;
    print "Key: $key\tValue: $codehash{$key}\n";
    print "Key: $key\n";
    print "Value: $codehash{$key}\n";
    print "\n\n";
}

See perldoc perlvar and search for /OUTPUT_AUTOFLUSH/.

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Yeah. I had tried that, although I didn't use the "local". Still get same output as before. –  Mark H Krause Feb 17 '12 at 19:44
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