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For example, lets say you have two classes:

public class TestA {}
public class TestB extends TestA{}

I have a method that returns a List<TestA> and I would like to cast all the objects in that list to TestB so that I'd end up with List<TestB>.

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2  
thanks for asking this question for me +1 :) –  KillBill Jul 19 '13 at 5:38
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10 Answers

up vote 189 down vote accepted

Simply casting to List<TestB> almost works; but it doesn't work because you can't cast a generic type of one parameter to another. However, you can cast through an intermediate wildcard type and it will be allowed (since you can cast to and from wildcard types, just with an unchecked warning):

List<TestB> variable = (List<TestB>)(List<?>) collectionOfListA;
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3  
The only proper answer. –  stepancheg Jun 1 '09 at 5:22
3  
Brilliant, Thank you. +1 –  stivlo May 14 '11 at 12:04
    
Great answer, just what I needed –  Slavus Nov 4 '11 at 10:50
20  
With all due respect, I think this is kind of a hacky solution -- you're dodging the type safety Java is trying to provide you. At least look at this Java tutorial (docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/subtyping.html) and consider why you have this problem before fixing it this way. –  jfritz42 Nov 30 '12 at 19:37
4  
It is hacky, yes, but exactly what I needed. Thanks. –  Burkhard Jul 9 '13 at 7:29
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casting of generics is not possible, but if you define the list in another way it is possible to store TestB in it:

List<? extends TestA> myList = new ArrayList<? extends TestA>();

You still have type checking to do when you are using the objects in the list.

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nice answer this needs to be marked as the correct answer, thanks :) –  Hakem Zaied Mar 26 '12 at 12:11
    
Agreed, this is the correct answer. –  GGrec Dec 3 '13 at 12:53
    
This is not even valid Java syntax. –  newacct Dec 3 '13 at 19:57
    
That is true, but it was more illustrative than factually correct –  Salandur Dec 3 '13 at 21:13
1  
@Gleeb: this is not even valid Java syntax –  newacct Mar 6 at 21:44
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You really can't, see this Java tutorial for the full explanation.

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+1 for the link to the Java tutorial that explains the heart of the matter. –  jfritz42 Nov 30 '12 at 19:22
    
Also, using the material in this link can avoid the unchecked conversion, since the compiler can decipher the entire conversion. –  Ryan H Jan 11 '13 at 15:49
6  
Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  Joachim Sauer Mar 15 '13 at 8:38
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I think you are casting in the wrong direction though... if the method returns a list of TestA objects, then it really isn't safe to cast them to TestB.

Basically you are asking the compiler to let you perform TestB operations on a type TestA that does not support them.

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D'oh, you're totally right. Curses! –  fiXedd Jun 1 '09 at 3:34
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This is possible due to type erasure. You will find that

List<TestA> x = new ArrayList<TestA>();
List<TestB> y = new ArrayList<TestB>();
x.getClass().equals(y.getClass()); // true

Internally both lists are of type List<Object>. For that reason you can't cast one to the other - there is nothing to cast.

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"There is nothing to cast" and "You can't cast one to the other" is a bit of a contradiction. Integer j = 42; Integer i = (Integer) j; works fine, both are integers, they both have the same class, so "there is nothing to cast". –  Simon André Forsberg Oct 18 '13 at 21:10
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You cannot cast List<TestB> to List<TestA> as Steve Kuo mentions BUT you can dump the contents of List<TestA> into List<TestB>. Try the following:

List<TestA> result = new List<TestA>();
List<TestB> data = new List<TestB>();
result.addAll(data);

I've not tried this code so there are probably mistakes but the idea is that it should iterate through the data object adding the elements (TestB objects) into the List. I hope that works for you.

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why was this down voted? It was useful to me, and I see no explanation for the down vote. –  zod Mar 28 '11 at 13:56
2  
Surely this post is not incorrect. But the person who asked the question finally needs a list of TestB. In that case this answer is misleading. You can add all the elements in List<TestB> to List<TestA> by calling List<TestA>.addAll(List<TestB>). But you can't use List<TestB>.addAll(List<TestA>); –  prageeth Aug 17 '12 at 11:27
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if you have an object of the class TestA, you can't cast it to TestB. every TestB is a TestA, but not the other way.

in the following code:

TestA a = new TestA();
TestB b = (TestB) a;

the second line would throw a ClassCastException.

you can only cast a TestA reference if the object itself is TestB. for example:

TestA a = new TestB();
TestB b = (TestB) a;

so, you may not always cast a list of TestA to a list of TestB.

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1  
I think he's talking about something like, you get 'a' as a method argument which is created as - TestA a = new TestB(), then you want to get the TestB object and then you need to cast it - TestB b = (TestB) a; –  KillBill Jul 19 '13 at 5:55
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When you cast an object reference you are just casting the type of the reference, not the type of the object. casting won't change the actual type of the object.

Java doesn't have implicit rules for converting Object types. (Unlike primitives)

Instead you need to provide how to convert one type to another and call it manually.

public class TestA {}
public class TestB extends TestA{ 
    TestB(TestA testA) {
        // build a TestB from a TestA
    }
}

List<TestA> result = .... 
List<TestB> data = new List<TestB>();
for(TestA testA : result) {
   data.add(new TestB(testA));
}

This is more verbose than in a language with direct support, but it works and you shouldn't need to do this very often.

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The only way I know is by copying:

List<TestB> list = new ArrayList<TestB> (
    Arrays.asList (
        testAList.toArray(new TestB[0])
    )
);
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Quite strange I think that this doesn't give a compiler warning. –  Simon André Forsberg Oct 18 '13 at 21:14
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The best safe way is to implement an AbstractList and cast items in implementation. I created ListUtil helper class:

public class ListUtil
{
    public static <TCastTo, TCastFrom extends TCastTo> List<TCastTo> convert(final List<TCastFrom> list)
    {
        return new AbstractList<TCastTo>() {
            @Override
            public TCastTo get(int i)
            {
                return list.get(i);
            }

            @Override
            public int size()
            {
                return list.size();
            }
        };
    }

    public static <TCastTo, TCastFrom> List<TCastTo> cast(final List<TCastFrom> list)
    {
        return new AbstractList<TCastTo>() {
            @Override
            public TCastTo get(int i)
            {
                return (TCastTo)list.get(i);
            }

            @Override
            public int size()
            {
                return list.size();
            }
        };
    }
}

You can use cast method to blindly cast objects in list and convert method for safe casting. Example:

void test(List<TestA> listA, List<TestB> listB)
{
    List<TestB> castedB = ListUtil.cast(listA); // all items are blindly casted
    List<TestB> convertedB = ListUtil.<TestB, TestA>convert(listA); // wrong cause TestA does not extend TestB
    List<TestA> convertedA = ListUtil.<TestA, TestB>convert(listB); // OK all items are safely casted
}
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