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Target: There is text file (on HDD) containing integers divided with some kind of delimiter.

Example:

5245
234224
6534
1234

I need to read them into STL container.

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
  using namespace std;

  // 1. prepare the file stream
  string fileName;
  if (argc > 1)
    fileName = argv[1];
  else {
    cout << "Provide the filename to read from: ";
    cin >> fileName;
  }
  unique_ptr<ifstream, ifstream_deleter<ifstream>> ptrToStream(new ifstream(fileName, ios::out));
  if (!ptrToStream->good()) {
    cerr << "Error opening file " << fileName << endl;
    return -1;
  }

  // 2. value by value reading will be too slow on large data so buffer data
  typedef unsigned int values_type;
  const int BUFFER_SIZE(4); // 4 is for testing purposes. 16MB or larger in real life
  vector<values_type> numbersBuffer(BUFFER_SIZE);
  numbersBuffer.insert(numbersBuffer.begin(), istream_iterator<values_type>(*ptrToStream), istream_iterator<values_type>());
  // ...

The main drawback of this code is how can I handle the issue when file size is extremely large, so I cannot store all of it's contents in memory ? I also do not want to use push_back as it is non efficient in comparison to interval insert.


So, the question is: how can I read not more than BUFFER_SIZE elements from the file effectively using STL?

share|improve this question
1  
This answer may help you out. –  ildjarn Feb 17 '12 at 21:41
    
What do you want to do with the numbers? Print them? Sum them? Sort them? The answer will depend upon a more complete question. –  Robᵩ Feb 17 '12 at 22:14
    
@Rob I need to read file's contents into the vector or other STL container supporting interval form of insert. The file can be large, so I would like to read by portions not the whole file at one time. –  DaddyM Feb 17 '12 at 23:16
    
Make your title describe the question. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 6 '13 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The approach to limit reading from input iterators is to create a wrapper which counts the number of elements processed so far and whose end iterator compares to this number. Doing this generically isn't quite trivial, doing it specifically for std::istream_iterator<T> shouldn't be too hard. That said, I think the easiest way to do it is this:

std::vector<T> buffer;
buffer.reserve(size);
std::istreambuf_iterator<T> it(in), end;
for (std::vector<T>::size_type count(0), capacity(size);
     it != end && count != capacity; ++it, ++count) {
    buffer.push_back(*it);
}

I realize that you don't want to push_back() because it is allegedly slow. However, compared to the I/O operation I doubt that you'll be able to measure the small overhead, especially with typical implementation of the I/O library.

Just to round things off with an example of a wrapped iterator: below is an example how a counting wrapper for std::istream_iterator<T> could look like. There are many different ways this could be done, this is just one of them.

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <sstream>

template <typename T>
class counted_istream_iterator:
    public std::iterator<std::input_iterator_tag, T, std::ptrdiff_t>
{
public:
    explicit counted_istream_iterator(std::istream& in): count_(), it_(in) {}
    explicit counted_istream_iterator(size_t count): count_(count), it_() {}

    T const& operator*() { return *this->it_; }
    T const* operator->() { return it_->it_.operator->(); }
    counted_istream_iterator& operator++() {
        ++this->count_; ++this->it_; return *this;
    }
    counted_istream_iterator operator++(int) {
        counted_istream_iterator rc(*this); ++*this; return rc;
    }

    bool operator== (counted_istream_iterator const& other) const {
        return this->count_ == other.count_ || this->it_ == other.it_;
    }
    bool operator!= (counted_istream_iterator const& other) const {
        return !(*this == other);
    }
private:
    std::ptrdiff_t           count_;
    std::istream_iterator<T> it_;
};

void read(int count)
{
    std::istringstream in("0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9");
    std::vector<int>   vec;
    vec.insert(vec.end(), counted_istream_iterator<int>(in),
               counted_istream_iterator<int>(count));
    std::cout << "size=" << vec.size() << "\n";
}

int main()
{
    read(4);
    read(100);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But I would like to make end iterator point to next by begin + size iterator and dunno how. Anyway is there is a way to use interval insert version? –  DaddyM Feb 17 '12 at 23:15
    
As I mentioned in the answer already: yes. You would create a wrapper holding an std::istream_iterator<T> and a count and compare both the iterator and the count to determine whether you have reached the end. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 18 '12 at 1:38
    
Hi! Please, explain me a bit about the wrapper. Do you mean I should use std::istream_iterator<T>::operator++() to retrieve only needed portion of data from istream? How it is better to transfer this data to vector? –  DaddyM Feb 18 '12 at 18:09
1  
No. What I mean is that you could write an iterator using an std::isteram_iterator<T> internally combined with a count which stops when the desired number of elements is read. I have added an example of this to my answer. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 18 '12 at 22:51
1  
@DaddyM: re std::istreambuf_iterator<char>: no. I suggest leaving this one alone unless you actually need to interact with the std::streambuf (which you don't in this case). re error recovery: use clear() to get the stream back into a usable state and then skip the bad data. How this looks depends in your needs. You might want to use ignore() to ignore the remainder of the line. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 20 '12 at 11:56

There is possible way to solve my problem:

// 2. value by value reading will be too slow on large data so buffer data
typedef unsigned int values_type;
const int BUFFER_SIZE(4);
vector<values_type> numbersBuffer;
numbersBuffer.reserve(BUFFER_SIZE);
istream_iterator<values_type> begin(*ptrToStream), end;
while (begin != end) {
  copy_n(begin, BUFFER_SIZE, numbersBuffer.begin());
  for_each(numbersBuffer.begin(), numbersBuffer.end(), [](values_type const &val){ std::cout << val << std::endl; });
  ++begin;
}

But it has one drawback. If input file contains the following:

8785
245245454545
7767

then 8785 will be read, but 245245454545 and 7767 will not, because 245245454545 cannot be converted to unsigned int. Error will be silent. :(

share|improve this answer
1  
Why would this be a solution better than using push_back() with a loop or, equivalently, using std::copy_n(it, n, std::back_inserter(buffer)? (interestingly, I hadn't realized that std::copy_n() was added to the algorithms library otherwise I wouldn't have used a loop) First setting up the buffer unnecessarily calls the default constructors for values which are about to be overridden. The only think you might want to do is to use reserve() on the container to make sure it doesn't need to be resized. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 19 '12 at 23:09
    
@DietmarKühl Probably, I've misunderstood you. But I've never said that this solution is better than others. –  DaddyM Feb 20 '12 at 6:45
    
@DietmarKühl Thank you for clarification! QUOTE: First setting up the buffer unnecessarily calls the default constructors for values which are about to be overridden. The only think you might want to do is to use reserve() on the container to make sure it doesn't need to be resized. –  DaddyM Feb 20 '12 at 6:51

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