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I'm still working on understanding NSOperations. I want the user to be able to initiate an HTTP request, have that request encapsulated into an NSOperation object, and then forget about it. I would like to release the NSOperation object in my main code, but have it retained by an NSOperationQueue.

Each NSOperation completes by saving the result into core data, or it can be cancelled. However, I think I only need to cancel all outstanding operations, and not an individual operation. I might cancel them all if the application is terminating, for example.

This allows me to let the user continue to initiate requests without having to track them individually. I can reuse the same object pointers to initialize the NSOperation object, queue it, then release it. This looks very straightforward if the NSOperationQueue retains the NSOperation when it's added.

Am I correct that the queue will retain the operation, so I can release it where it was instantiated?

Also, since I am new to ARC (I haven't tried it yet), how do I transfer this ownership? I suppose I want the NSOperation to have a strong property attribute within the queue, but I wouldn't think I want to instantiate it with a weak property attribute.

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You are right. NSOperationQueues retains (strong reference) NSOperations added to it. The are automatically removed from queue and released when the operation ends.

You should ensure that your NSOperation subclasses are KVO compliant for isExecuting and isFinished failing which the NSOperationQueue will have no idea if the NSOperation is complete.

Using ARC, you don't have to "transfer" ownership in this case. You "transfer" ownership only when you create a Core Foundation object (methods like CF*Create or CF*alloc) and assign it to a Objective-C object.

I wrote in detail about ARC on my blog if you are interested.

You might also want to look at MKNetworkKit, a networking framework I wrote that takes care of pretty much everything you need.

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Thanks, Mugunth. Both references look like great resources. I have already scoured the MKNetworkKit to better understand some of the basic things I need to know about NSOperation. The ARC blog is good reading so far, too. It looks very complete. –  Jim Feb 20 '12 at 6:33
    
"You should ensure that your NSOperation subclasses are KVO compliant for isExecuting and isFinished failing which the NSOperationQueue will have no idea if the NSOperation is complete." -Worth emphasizing . –  prajul May 29 '13 at 9:13

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