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How do I use Assert (or other Test class?) to verify that an exception has been thrown?

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Which unit testing framework are you using? –  Kevin Pullin Jun 1 '09 at 5:04
1  
Visual Studio Integrated –  Alex Jun 1 '09 at 5:05
2  
Doesn't ExpectedException attribute help? ref: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  shahkalpesh Jun 1 '09 at 5:10
1  
Funny, I just finished looking for the answer to this, found it at stackoverflow.com/questions/741029/testing-exceptions. –  dfjacobs Jun 1 '09 at 5:12
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12 Answers

up vote 270 down vote accepted

For "Visual Studio Team Test" it appears you apply the ExpectedException attribute to the test's method.

Sample from the documentation here: A Unit Testing Walkthrough with Visual Studio Team Test

[TestMethod]
[ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentException),
    "A userId of null was inappropriately allowed.")]
public void NullUserIdInConstructor()
{
   LogonInfo logonInfo = new LogonInfo(null, "P@ss0word");
}
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15  
ExpectedException attribute above works in NUnit as well (but [TestMethod] should be [Test]). –  dbkk Jun 1 '09 at 5:20
1  
@dbkk: Doesnt work exactly the same in NUnit - the message is treated as a string that needs to matcvh the exception message (and IU think that makes more sense) –  Ruben Bartelink Jun 25 '09 at 10:48
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try {
    somethingThatShouldThrowAnAcception();
    Assert.Fail(); // If it gets to this line, no exception was thrown
} catch (GoodException) { }

You should be able to adapt this approach to whatever you like -- including specifying what kinds of exceptions to catch. If you only expect certain types, finish the catch blocks off with:

} catch (GoodException) {
} catch (Exception) {
    // not the right kind of exception
    Assert.Fail();
}

EDIT: As you can see, there are some framework-specific solutions to your problem. This trick could come in handy later, when/if you're using another framework. ;) One advantage is that you get fine-grained control over which line is supposed to throw the exception.

EDIT2: As @Jonas points out, you can't do this:

try {
    somethingThatShouldThrowAnAcception();
    Assert.Fail();
} catch (Exception) { }

...because Assert.Fail() works by throwing an AssertionException. If you really want to catch Exception, just include something like this to rethrow the Assert.Fail():

catch (AssertionException) { throw; }
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+1, I use this way instead of the attribute when I need to make assertions beyond just the type of exception. For example, what if one needs to check that certain fields in the exception instance are set to certain values. –  Pavel Repin Jun 1 '09 at 5:38
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You are not required to specify the error message. This is sufficient: [ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentException))] –  mibollma Jul 20 '12 at 8:05
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I think this solution is the best. [ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentException))] has it's uses, if the test is simple, but it is in my view a lazy solution and being to comfortable with can lead to pitfalls. This solution give you specific control to do a more correct test, plus you can to a test Writeline to your test run report, that the exception was indeed thrown as expected. –  evilfish Jan 7 '13 at 12:16
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Be careful with that because Assert.Fail() raise an exception, if you catch it, the test pass! –  Jonas Feb 15 '13 at 10:54
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@Vinnyq12 What I mean is that the first test in the example above will never fail. A test fail if an exception is thrown (and not "catch" by the ExpectedExceptionAttribute) –  Jonas Mar 6 '13 at 10:45
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If you're using MSTest, which originally didn't have an ExpectedException attribute, you could do this:

try 
{
    SomeExceptionThrowingMethod()
    Assert.Fail("no exception thrown");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Assert.IsTrue(ex is SpecificExceptionType);
}
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My preferred method for implementing this is to write a method called Throws, and use it just like any other Assert method. Unfortunately, .NET doesn't allow you to write a static extension method, so you can't use this method as if it actually belongs to the build in Assert class; just make another called MyAssert or something similar. The class looks like this:

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace YourProject.Tests
{
    public static class MyAssert
    {
        public static void Throws<T>( Action func ) where T : Exception
        {
            var exceptionThrown = false;
            try
            {
                func.Invoke();
            }
            catch ( T )
            {
                exceptionThrown = true;
            }

            if ( !exceptionThrown )
            {
                throw new AssertFailedException(
                    String.Format("An exception of type {0} was expected, but not thrown", typeof(T))
                    );
            }
        }
    }
}

That means that your unit test looks like this:

    [TestMethod()]
    public void ExceptionTest()
    {
        String testStr = null;

        MyAssert.Throws<NullReferenceException>( () => testStr.ToUpper(  ) );
    }

Which looks and behaves much more like the rest of your unit test syntaxes.

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1  
I like this approach. –  Daniel James Bryars Sep 22 '11 at 23:11
2  
I think that is the best answer so far! –  Ekaterina Oct 21 '11 at 11:33
    
so you dont like attributes? –  Mickey Perlstein May 14 '12 at 12:08
    
Get rid of the bool flag and put the throw on the line directly after the invoke for a more compact implementation. –  g t Jan 18 '13 at 9:10
3  
The only thing that makes this better is having the function return the caught exception so that you can continue asserting that things like the attributes on the exception is correct. –  Mark Hildreth Nov 1 '13 at 21:16
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Be wary of using ExpectedException, as it can lead to several pitfalls as demonstrated here:

http://geekswithblogs.net/sdorman/archive/2009/01/17/unit-testing-and-expected-exceptions.aspx

And here:

http://xunit.codeplex.com/Wiki/View.aspx?title=Comparisons#note1

If you need to test for exceptions, there are less frowned upon ways. You can use the try{act/fail}catch{assert} method, which can be useful for frameworks that don't have direct support for exception tests other than ExpectedException.

A better alternative is to use xUnit.NET, which is a very modern, forward looking, and extensible unit testing framework that has learned from all the others mistakes, and improved. One such improvement is Assert.Throws, which provides a much better syntax for asserting exceptions.

You can find xUnit.NET at CodePlex: http://www.codeplex.com/xunit

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4  
Note that NUnit 2.5 also supports Assert.Throws style syntax now too - nunit.com/index.php?p=releaseNotes&r=2.5 –  Alconja Jun 1 '09 at 5:54
    
The way that the unit tests stop to let you know about the exception when using ExpectedException drives me crazy. Why did MS think it was a good idea to have a manual step in automated tests? Thanks for the links. –  Ant Apr 6 '11 at 12:25
    
@Ant: MS copied NUnit...so the real question is, why did NUnit think it was a good idea? –  jrista Apr 6 '11 at 16:50
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In a project i´m working on we have another solution doing this.

First I don´t like the ExpectedExceptionAttribute becuase it does take in consideration which method call that caused the Exception.

I do this with a helpermethod instead.

Test

[TestMethod]
public void AccountRepository_ThrowsExceptionIfFileisCorrupt()
{
     var file = File.Create("Accounts.bin");
     file.WriteByte(1);
     file.Close();

     IAccountRepository repo = new FileAccountRepository();
     TestHelpers.AssertThrows<SerializationException>(()=>repo.GetAll());            
}

HelperMethod

public static TException AssertThrows<TException>(Action action) where TException : Exception
    {
        try
        {
            action();
        }
        catch (TException ex)
        {
            return ex;
        }
        Assert.Fail("Expected exception was not thrown");

        return null;
    }

Neat, isn´t it;)

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It is an attribute on the test method... you don't use Assert. Looks like this:

[ExpectedException(typeof(ExceptionType))]
public void YourMethod_should_throw_exception()
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if you use NUNIT, you can do something like this:

Assert.Throws<ExpectedException>(() => methodToTest());
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The helper provided by @Richiban above works great except it doesn't handle the situation where an exception is thrown, but not the type expected. The following addresses that:

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace YourProject.Tests
{
    public static class MyAssert
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Helper for Asserting that a function throws an exception of a particular type.
        /// </summary>
        public static void Throws<T>( Action func ) where T : Exception
        {
            Exception exceptionOther = null;
            var exceptionThrown = false;
            try
            {
                func.Invoke();
            }
            catch ( T )
            {
                exceptionThrown = true;
            }
            catch (Exception e) {
                exceptionOther = e;
            }

            if ( !exceptionThrown )
            {
                if (exceptionOther != null) {
                    throw new AssertFailedException(
                        String.Format("An exception of type {0} was expected, but not thrown. Instead, an exception of type {1} was thrown.", typeof(T), exceptionOther.GetType()),
                        exceptionOther
                        );
                }

                throw new AssertFailedException(
                    String.Format("An exception of type {0} was expected, but no exception was thrown.", typeof(T))
                    );
            }
        }
    }
}
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Hmmm... I understand the idea, but I'm not sure I agree it's better. Just because we want to ensure a specific exception is raised doesn't mean all others should be wrapped up as an assertion failure. IMHO an unknown exception should just bubble up the stack as it would in any other assert operation. –  Crono Nov 29 '13 at 20:08
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Check out nUnit Docs for examples about:

[ExpectedException( typeof( ArgumentException ) )]
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This is going to depend on what test framework are you using?

In MbUnit, for example, you can specify the expected exception with an attribute to ensure that you are getting the exception you really expect.

[ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentException))]
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Well i'll pretty much sum up what everyone else here said before...Anyways, here's the code i built according to the good answers :) All is left to do is copy and use...

/// <summary>
/// Checks to make sure that the input delegate throws a exception of type TException.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TException">The type of exception expected.</typeparam>
/// <param name="methodToExecute">The method to execute to generate the exception.</param>
public static void AssertRaises<TException>(Action methodToExecute) where TException : System.Exception
{
    try
    {
        methodToExecute();
    }
    catch (TException) {
        return;
    }  
    catch (System.Exception ex)
    {
        Assert.Fail("Expected exception of type " + typeof(TException) + " but type of " + ex.GetType() + " was thrown instead.");
    }
    Assert.Fail("Expected exception of type " + typeof(TException) + " but no exception was thrown.");  
}
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