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Let's say I have a string representing the keys in an object. Here's an example:

var obj = {
    test: 12,
    high: {
      sky: {
        val: 14
      }
    },
    low: [1, 2, 3]
},
keys = 'high.sky.val';

So, I want to set the value of obj.high.sky.val (with 'high.sky.val' being in a string).

I know how to read the value (though, this may not be the best way):

var keyPieces = keys.split('.'), value = obj;
keyPieces.forEach(function(x){
   value = value[x];
});
console.log(value); // 14

I can't figure out how to set obj.high.sky.val (without using eval).

How can I set the value of a property in an object, if that key is a string?

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just for fun:

function setKey(key, value, targetObject) {
  var keys = key.split('.'), obj = targetObject || window, keyPart;
  while ((keyPart = keys.shift()) && keys.length) {
    obj = obj[keyPart];
  }
  obj[keyPart] = value;
}

Edit: The previous version wouldn't have worked with "no-dot" keys... Fixed.

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How do I tell it what object to use? –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 17 '12 at 23:08
    
Hang on, editing. I assumed you wanted to start resolving from the global object... there you go, now it can optionally have a target object (otherwise it defaults to window). If you don't want the window default, just remove " || window". –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 17 '12 at 23:11
    
@Rocket, edited it a bit for simplicity. –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 17 '12 at 23:19
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I actually had to make a couple of functions to achieve this end when working in GameMaker:HTML5

function js_get(varname) {
    if( varname.indexOf(".") < 0)
        return window[varname];
    else {
        var curr = window, steps = varname.split("."), next;
        while(next = steps.shift()) curr = curr[next];
        return curr;
    }
}
function js_set(varname,value) {
    if( varname.indexOf(".") < 0)
        window[varname] = value;
    else {
        var curr = window, steps = varname.split("."), next, last = steps.pop();
        while(next = steps.shift()) curr = curr[next];
        curr[last] = value;
    }
}

This works because objects are passed by reference in JS.

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In my code, I tried doing value = 1000;, and it didn't update the value. I guess I needed to stop at the 2nd to last object, and then set the value. Why didn't value = 1000; work? –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 17 '12 at 22:20
    
That's what this code does, with the last = steps.pop(). I just double-checked it, and it does work. Another test: a = {b:{c:1}}; d = a.b; d.c = 2; alert(a.b.c); // alerts 2, not 1 –  Niet the Dark Absol Feb 17 '12 at 22:21
    
Weird. a = {b:{c:1}}; d = a.b.c; d = 2; alert(a.b.c); alerts 1. Wonder why that is. I guess because d was set to a value (int), not an object. That would make sense. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 17 '12 at 22:22
    
You missed a bit - I assigned d = a.b, and d.c = 2. That's why this works. –  Niet the Dark Absol Feb 17 '12 at 22:24
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function setDeep(el, key, value) {
    key = key.split('.');
    var i = 0, n = key.length;
    for (; i < n-1; ++i) {
        el = el[key[i]];
    }
    return el[key[i]] = value;
}

function getDeep(el, key) {
    key = key.split('.');
    var i = 0, n = key.length;
    for (; i < n; ++i) {
        el = el[key[i]];
    }
    return el;
}

and you can use it thus:

setDeep(obj, 'high.sky.val', newValue);
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2  
Shouldn't it be el[key[i]]? –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 17 '12 at 22:18
    
According to @Kolink's answer, you need to stop at the 2nd to last property when setting, so that el is an object, and not an int. Also, when getting, you needed to use el[key[i]]. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 17 '12 at 22:28
    
@Rocket, yes thanks for editing. –  Mike Samuel Feb 17 '12 at 23:20
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You can use a pair of functions to set and get values. I just threw together an example.

objGet takes an object and key string. It will attempt to get the value. If it can't find it it will return undefined.

objSet takes an object, key string and value. It will attempt to find and set the value. If it can't (because of a bad key string) it will return undefined. Else it returns the value passed.

function objGet(obj, keyString) {
    for(var keys = keyString.split('.'), i = 0, l = keys.length; i < l; i++) {
        obj = obj[keys[i]];
        if(obj === undefined) return undefined;
    }
    return obj;
}

function objSet(obj, keyString, val) {
    for(var keys = keyString.split('.'), i = 0, l = keys.length; i < l - 1; i++) {
        obj = obj[keys[i]];
        if(obj === undefined) return undefined;
    }
    if(obj[keys[l - 1]] === undefined) return undefined;
    obj[keys[l - 1]] = val;
    return val;
}


//// TESTING

var obj = {
    test: 12,
    high: {
        sky: {
            val: 14
        }
    },
    low: [1, 2, 3]
};

objGet(obj, 'test'); // returns 12
objGet(obj, 'high.sky.val'); // returns 14
objGet(obj, 'high.sky.non.existant'); // returns undefined

objSet(obj, 'test', 999); // return 999
obj.test; // 999

objSet(obj, 'high.sky.non.existant', 1234); // returns undefined
obj.high.sky; // { val: 14 }

objSet(obj, 'high.sky.val', 111); // returns 111
obj.high.sky; // { val: 111 }
share|improve this answer
    
Cool, this works :-) –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 17 '12 at 22:30
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