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I'm trying to generate XML like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE APIRequest SYSTEM
"https://url">
<APIRequest>
  <Head>
      <Key>123</Key>
  </Head>
  <ObjectClass>
    <Field>Value</Field
  </ObjectClass>
</APIRequest>

I have a class (ObjectClass) decorated with XMLSerialization attributes like this:

[XmlRoot("ObjectClass")]
public class ObjectClass
{
    [XmlElement("Field")]
    public string Field { get; set; }
}

And my really hacky intuitive thought to just get this working is to do this when I serialize:

ObjectClass inst = new ObjectClass();
XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(inst.GetType(), "");

StringWriter w = new StringWriter();
w.WriteLine(@"<?xml version=""1.0""?>");
w.WriteLine("<!DOCTYPE APIRequest SYSTEM");
w.WriteLine(@"""https://url"">");
w.WriteLine("<APIRequest>");
w.WriteLine("<Head>");
w.WriteLine(@"<Field>Value</Field>");
w.WriteLine(@"</Head>");

XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
ns.Add("", ""); 
serializer.Serialize(w, inst, ns);

w.WriteLine("</APIRequest>");

However, this generates XML like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE APIRequest SYSTEM
"https://url">
<APIRequest>
  <Head>
      <Key>123</Key>
  </Head>
  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
  <ObjectClass>
    <Field>Value</Field>
  </ObjectClass>
</APIRequest>

i.e. the serialize statement is automatically adding a <?xml text declaration.

I know I'm attacking this wrong so can someone point me in the right direction?

As a note, I don't think it will make practical sense to just make an APIRequest class with an ObjectClass in it (because there are say 20 different types of ObjectClass that each needs this boilerplate around them) but correct me if I'm wrong.

share|improve this question
    
try DataContractSerializer. –  ArsenMkrt Jun 1 '09 at 5:37
    
Thanks, any ideas for .NET 2.0 though? –  Matt Mitchell Jun 1 '09 at 5:43
    
Automatically? You seem to be adding the declaration manually: w.WriteLine(@"<?xml version=""1.0""?>");. –  Cerebrus Jun 1 '09 at 5:47
1  
@Cerebrus, he does not want the inner <?xml?> inside the <APIRequest> tag. –  Simon Svensson Jun 1 '09 at 5:55
    
Yep that's it thanks for clearing that up :-) –  Matt Mitchell Jun 1 '09 at 6:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Never build xml using string concatenation. It's evil.

Output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<!DOCTYPE APIRequest SYSTEM "https://url">
<APIRequest>
  <Head>
    <Key>123</Key>
  </Head>
  <ObjectClass>
    <Field>Value</Field>
  </ObjectClass>
</APIRequest>

Code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

public static class Program {
    public static void Main() {
        var obj = new ObjectClass { Field = "Value" };

        var settings = new XmlWriterSettings {
            Indent = true
        };

        var xml = new StringBuilder();
        using (var writer = XmlWriter.Create(xml, settings)) {
            Debug.Assert(writer != null);

            writer.WriteDocType("APIRequest", null, "https://url", null);
            writer.WriteStartElement("APIRequest");
            writer.WriteStartElement("Head");
            writer.WriteElementString("Key", "123");
            writer.WriteEndElement(); // </Head>

            var nsSerializer = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
            nsSerializer.Add("", "");

            var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(obj.GetType(), "");
            xmlSerializer.Serialize(writer, obj, nsSerializer);

            writer.WriteEndElement(); // </APIRequest>
        }

        Console.WriteLine(xml.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

[XmlRoot("ObjectClass")]
public class ObjectClass {
    [XmlElement("Field")]
    public string Field { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I knew the string concat was bad but I thought it would at least work - I guess not! Thanks :-) –  Matt Mitchell Jun 1 '09 at 6:01
    
Just checked - thanks heaps! –  Matt Mitchell Jun 1 '09 at 6:05
    
I wouldn't say it's evil. It's not preferred, but if you have situations where performance is crucial and you've identified the writer as the source of that performance hit, then using string concatenation can be a tremendous win. Of course, it is situational, and I'd almost always use XmlWriter, but in some cases, it is justified. –  casperOne Jul 19 '12 at 17:25

try this:

internal static string ToXml(object obj)
{
  string retval = null;
  if (obj != null)
  {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    using(XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(sb, new XmlWriterSettings() { OmitXmlDeclaration = true }))
    {
      new XmlSerializer(obj.GetType()).Serialize(writer, obj);
    }
    retval = sb.ToString();
  }
  return retval;
}
share|improve this answer

If you don't want to rely on an xml writer for performance reasons etc you can do this:

// Read into memory stream and set namespaces to empty strings
XmlSerializerNamespaces nsSerializer = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
nsSerializer.Add(string.Empty, string.Empty);
XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Model.AudioItem));
xs.Serialize(ms, item, nsSerializer);

// Read into UTF-8 stream and read off first line (i.e "<?xml version="1.0"?>")
StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(ms);
ms.Position = 0;
sr.ReadLine();

sr.ReadToEnd().ToString() now contains the naked serialization

share|improve this answer
    
feels dirty, and yet clever, for the ReadLine trick. I like it. Any concerns with indenting and such? –  sirthomas Feb 23 at 21:57

The two-line answer is: use an XmlWriterSettings object with the OmitXmlDeclaration property to True -- pass the settings object as the second parameter when you create your XmlWriter.

share|improve this answer
1  
-1: Nonsense. Read the question. –  John Saunders May 28 '10 at 2:01

Derive your own XmlTextWriter to omit the XML declaration.

Private Class MyXmlTextWriter
Inherits XmlTextWriter
Sub New(ByVal sb As StringBuilder)
	MyBase.New(New StringWriter(sb))
End Sub
Sub New(ByVal w As TextWriter)
	MyBase.New(w)
End Sub

Public Overrides Sub WriteStartDocument()
	' Don't emit XML declaration
End Sub
Public Overrides Sub WriteStartDocument(ByVal standalone As Boolean)
	' Don't emit XML declaration
End Sub
End Class

Call Serialize with an instance of the derived MyXmlTextWriter.

Dim tw As New MyXmlTextWriter(sb)
Dim objXmlSerializer As New XmlSerializer(type)
objXmlSerializer.Serialize(tw, obj)
share|improve this answer
2  
@Doug D: I have trouble believing you consider this to be a better solution. –  John Saunders Jul 31 '09 at 1:48

Scott Hanselman's got a good post on this. I used Kzu's example (which Scott's blog points to) a while back for the same thing and it worked great.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Tone: kind of a meee-tooo? It's just what Doug D said a month ago. -1. –  John Saunders Jul 31 '09 at 1:50

One liner, to remove the first line from a string:

String.Join("\n", strXML.Split('\n').Skip(1).ToArray())

Not elegant, but concise.

share|improve this answer
1  
-1: how does it help? –  John Saunders Jan 15 '10 at 4:05

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