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I would like to use a decorator on a function that I will subsequently pass to a multiprocessing pool. However, the code fails with "PicklingError: Can't pickle : attribute lookup __builtin__.function failed". I don't quite see why it fails here. I feel certain that it's something simple, but I can't find it. Below is a minimal "working" example. I thought that using the functools function would be enough to let this work.

If I comment out the function decoration, it works without an issue. What is it about multiprocessing that I'm misunderstanding here? Is there any way to make this work?

Edit: After adding both a callable class decorator and a function decorator, it turns out that the function decorator works as expected. The callable class decorator continues to fail. What is it about the callable class version that keeps it from being pickled?

import random
import multiprocessing
import functools

class my_decorator_class(object):
    def __init__(self, target):
        self.target = target
        try:
            functools.update_wrapper(self, target)
        except:
            pass

    def __call__(self, elements):
        f = []
        for element in elements:
            f.append(self.target([element])[0])
        return f

def my_decorator_function(target):
    @functools.wraps(target)
    def inner(elements):
        f = []
        for element in elements:
            f.append(target([element])[0])
        return f
    return inner

@my_decorator_function
def my_func(elements):
    f = []
    for element in elements:
        f.append(sum(element))
    return f

if __name__ == '__main__':
    elements = [[random.randint(0, 9) for _ in range(5)] for _ in range(10)]
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=4)
    results = [pool.apply_async(my_func, ([e],)) for e in elements]
    pool.close()
    f = [r.get()[0] for r in results]
    print(f)
share|improve this question
    
This post seems to indicate that pickling decorated objects is tricky: gael-varoquaux.info/blog/?p=120 –  Daenyth Feb 17 '12 at 23:03
    
Yes, I found that page, as well. That's why I added the functools wrapper. But it doesn't seem to make any difference. I confess that I don't really understand what is happening underneath to see why it fails. –  agarrett Feb 17 '12 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is that pickle needs to have some way to reassemble everything that you pickle. See here for a list of what can be pickled:

http://docs.python.org/library/pickle.html#what-can-be-pickled-and-unpickled

When pickling my_func, the following components need to be pickled:

  • An instance of my_decorator_class, called my_func

    This is fine. Pickle will store the name of the class and pickle its __dict__ contents. When unpickling, it uses the name to find the class, then creates an instance and fills in the __dict__ contents. However, the __dict__ contents present a problem...

  • The instance of the original my_func that's stored in my_func.target

    This isn't so good. It's a function at the top-level, and normally these can be pickled. Pickle will store the name of the function. The problem, however, is that the name "my_func" is no longer bound to the undecorated function, it's bound to the decorated function. This means that pickle won't be able to look up the undecorated function to recreate the object. Sadly, pickle doesn't have any way to know that object it's trying to pickle can always be found under the name main.my_func.

You can change it like this and it will work:

import random
import multiprocessing
import functools

class my_decorator(object):
    def __init__(self, target):
        self.target = target
        try:
            functools.update_wrapper(self, target)
        except:
            pass

    def __call__(self, candidates, args):
        f = []
        for candidate in candidates:
            f.append(self.target([candidate], args)[0])
        return f

def old_my_func(candidates, args):
    f = []
    for c in candidates:
        f.append(sum(c))
    return f

my_func = my_decorator(old_my_func)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    candidates = [[random.randint(0, 9) for _ in range(5)] for _ in range(10)]
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=4)
    results = [pool.apply_async(my_func, ([c], {})) for c in candidates]
    pool.close()
    f = [r.get()[0] for r in results]
    print(f)

You have observed that the decorator function works when the class does not. I believe this is because functools.wraps modifies the decorated function so that it has the name and other properties of the function it wraps. As far as the pickle module can tell, it is indistinguishable from a normal top-level function, so it pickles it by storing its name. Upon unpickling, the name is bound to the decorated function so everything works out.

share|improve this answer
    
OK. So if I want these things to pickle, and if I want to use a callable class as my decorator, then I won't be able to use the @ decoration approach. I'll have to use it as if I were instantiating the class. Is that correct? –  agarrett Feb 17 '12 at 23:30
    
I believe that is correct. Alternatively, you could avoid pickling it at all by creating a trivial non-decorated top-level function that just forwards to the decorated function. –  Weeble Feb 17 '12 at 23:39
    
Very clear. Thanks so much. –  agarrett Feb 17 '12 at 23:40

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