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I am trying to use Python's itertools module to speed up a triple nested for loop. The test code below compares a standard triple nested loop with itertools' product method and outputs:

Nested loop time = 2.35023 secs

Itertools loop time = 2.67766 secs

Am I missing something?

import numpy
import itertools
import time

n = 128
a = numpy.arange(n**3).reshape((n,n,n))
b = numpy.zeros((n,n,n))
c = numpy.zeros((n,n,n))

t = time.time()
for i in range(n):
    for j in range(n):
        for k in range(n):
            b[i,j,k] = a[i,j,k]
print 'Nested loop time = %g secs' % (time.time() - t)

t = time.time()
for (i,j,k) in itertools.product(range(n), repeat=3):
    c[i,j,k] = a[i,j,k]
print 'Itertools loop time = %g secs' % (time.time() - t)
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"Am I missing something?" -- What you seem to be missing is that nobody claimed that the idea of itertools.product() is to speed up nested for loops- –  Sven Marnach Feb 19 '12 at 3:14
1  
@Sven Marnach 9.7. itertools — Functions creating iterators for efficient looping...docs.python.org/library/itertools.html –  Robert William Hanks Feb 20 '12 at 1:56

2 Answers 2

It does seem like itertools.product is slower for large values of n:

In [24]: print _23
from itertools import product

def nested_loops(n):
    for i in range(n):
        for j in range(n):
            for k in range(n):
                pass

def itertools_product(n):
    for (i,j,k) in product(range(n), repeat=3):
        pass


In [25]: %timeit nested_loops(128)
10 loops, best of 3: 68.6 ms per loop

In [26]: %timeit itertools_product(128)
10 loops, best of 3: 162 ms per loop

In [27]: %timeit nested_loops(10)
10000 loops, best of 3: 84.5 us per loop

In [28]: %timeit itertools_product(10)
10000 loops, best of 3: 79.8 us per loop

In [30]: %timeit nested_loops(300)
1 loops, best of 3: 833 ms per loop

In [31]: %timeit itertools_product(300)
1 loops, best of 3: 2.07 s per loop

And without the tuple unpacking:

In [40]: print _39
from itertools import product

def itertools_product(n):
    for ijk in product(range(n), repeat=3):
        pass

In [41]: %timeit itertools_product(128)
10 loops, best of 3: 115 ms per loop

In [42]: %timeit itertools_product(10)
10000 loops, best of 3: 59.2 us per loop

In [43]: %timeit itertools_product(300)
1 loops, best of 3: 1.47 s per loop

Also, for fun, list comprehensions and generator expressions:

def list_comprehension_product(n):
    range_n = range(n)
    for (i,j,k) in [ (i, j, k) for i in range_n for j in range_n for k in range_n ]:
        pass

def generator_expression_product(n):
    range_n = range(n)
    for (i,j,k) in ( (i, j, k) for i in range_n for j in range_n for k in range_n ):
        pass

In [51]: %timeit list_comprehension_product(128)
1 loops, best of 3: 583 ms per loop

In [52]: %timeit generator_expression_product(128)
1 loops, best of 3: 480 ms per loop

These benchmarks were run with python --version:

2.6.7 (r267:88850, Jul 31 2011, 19:30:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Based on Apple Inc. build 5658) (LLVM build 2335.15.00)]
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1  
Yes, it does seem to be slower for large ranges. And that's exactly where you want it to be faster - right? –  repoman Feb 17 '12 at 23:50

It does seem that the second loop is slower than the first, perhaps because of the tuple unpacking. You don't have to do that, and I find it makes the second loop faster to do it like this:

for ijk in itertools.product(range(n), repeat=3):
    c[ijk] = a[ijk]

Of course, with numpy, you want to avoid looping over elements at all, and instead use numpy operations on the entire array at once. That way, all the looping, etc, is being done in C, and you'll get huge speedups.

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't want this to be numpy related. Just used numpy to have something that would allow for quick triple indexing. Could have been a call to some function with a triple argument... –  repoman Feb 17 '12 at 23:49

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