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I'm building a much much larger program, and I've tried several methods (all of which work) but I'm liking this method currently, although I don't know if certain aspects of it represent bad programming practice. The code used in this example is just to get the idea across without pasting the whole code.

This code (pasted below) creates a new ClassMain object with a label and a static method to edit the label. ClassEditor is instantiated from ClassMain, which returns a button.

Now here is where I want to know if it's bad practice, I have an action on the button which, when clicked, calls the static method in ClassMain and sets the label to a random number. The reason I'm wondering whether it's bad practice is because I don't actually call the method from a direct instantiation of the ClassMain object, I just do: ClassMain.setLabel("");. And I'm not entirely sure what this is calling. I have one instantiation of ClassMain, but if I had multiple, would it still work? So how can I edit aspects of a created object through this way of doing it rather than using a reference variable? If I had multiple classes would it create issues?

Sorry if these questions are rambled, it's hard to ask exactly. I've provided the code below so you can see what I'm on about.

PS: Relating to the issue of if it would be an issue of more than one object of ClassMain, I created another an both buttons in both windows only updated one label. Why is this? And does this mean it's not bad practice if used for one instantiation but bad if used for more? I hope someone can help me out with these issues!

ClassMain:

import java.awt.GridLayout;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;


public class ClassMain extends JFrame {

    private static JLabel l;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new ClassMain();
    }

    public ClassMain() {
        super("This is my app");
        setSize(450,80);
        setLayout(new GridLayout(0,2));
        l = new JLabel("Hi");

        ClassEditor ce = new ClassEditor();

        add(l);
        add(ce.getButton());

        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void setLabel(String stringA) {
        l.setText(stringA);
    }

}

ClassEditor:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;


public class ClassEditor implements ActionListener {

    public ClassEditor() {
        ClassMain.setLabel("Click the button for a random number!");
    } 

    public JButton getButton() {
        JButton b = new JButton("Click me!");
        b.addActionListener(this);
        return b;
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
        int i = (int) (Math.random()*10);
        ClassMain.setLabel("Random Number: "+i);
    }

}

Big thanks to anyone who can help me out, very much appreciated. Just trying to learn and understand good practices and why they work.

share|improve this question
1  
That's perfectly fine is you'll only have the one single label. You could instead consider just returning the label itself with something like CalssMain.getLabel().setText(text);. –  paranoid-android Feb 18 '12 at 0:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I probably wouldn't use static metods and variables and simply rewrite it like this (I also changed names - a good practice is to have everything named in a way that everyone knows what does it mean):

ClassMain:

import java.awt.GridLayout;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;


public class ClassMain extends JFrame {

    private JLabel label;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new ClassMain();
    }

    public ClassMain() {
        super("This is my app");
        setSize(450,80);
        setLayout(new GridLayout(0,2));
        label = new JLabel("Hi");

        ClassEditor classEditor = new ClassEditor(this);

        add(label);
        add(classEditor.getButton());

        setVisible(true);
    }

    public void setLabel(String text) {
        label.setText(text);
    }

}

ClassEditor:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;


public class ClassEditor implements ActionListener {

    private ClassMain classMain;

    public ClassEditor(ClassMain classMain) {
        this.classMain = classMain;
        classMain.setLabel("Click the button for a random number!");
    } 

    public JButton getButton() {
        JButton button = new JButton("Click me!");
        button.addActionListener(this);
        return button;
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
        int i = (int) (Math.random()*10);
        classMain.setLabel("Random Number: "+i);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for NOT using static methods and variables. –  camickr Feb 18 '12 at 16:21

Although this works, it has the big problem that ClassEditor is tightly-coupled to ClassMain, i.e. it cannot be re-used for any other purpose.

It would be better to pass the JButton to the editor class in its constructor.

This kind of loose coupling makes your code simpler, easier to modify, easier to re-use and easier to test.

public class ClassEditor implements ActionListener {

    JButton button;

    public ClassEditor(JButton b) {
        button = b;
        button.setLabel("Click the button for a random number!");
    } 

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
        int i = (int) (Math.random()*10);
        button.setLabel("Random Number: "+i);
    }
}

Another common pattern is to use an anonymous listener:

final JButton button = new JButton();
button.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){
        button.setLabel("Boo!");
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Both instances updated the same label because you made it a static variable.That means any instance of your main class will refer to the same jlabel object. It took me a long time to really understand how the statics work. I had static variables everywhere in my swing app.

share|improve this answer
    
Confusing stuff, but nice explanation. So because it's static, it refers to the original JLabel Object? –  mino Feb 18 '12 at 14:00
1  
Yes. It's basically a global variable, which may be the best way to explain it. I struggled with this concept for a while. The best example to me is a counter variable. Say you have an int counter in your ClassMain that you add 1 to each time your constructor creates a new object. Then you can call ClassMain.getCounter() to find how many objects ClassMain has created overall. If the variable was not static, then each time you got the value of counter it would just be 1 instead of a global count. –  Logan Feb 18 '12 at 14:12
    
This might be a stupid question, but then why doesn't the next JLabel in the next instantiation of the ClassMain class update, only the first? –  mino Feb 18 '12 at 14:23
1  
That's not a stupid question at all, it's actually a pretty good one. It's hard to tell without seeing all of the code. Maybe put a System.out.println() in your action performed method to make sure it's calling the method for each button like you think it is. I'm always confused about where the static variable is stored in memory and how others instances know unless they area ll on the same JVM. I understand the concept on a server, but standalone apps, I find it confusing if the static is part of the main class. –  Logan Feb 18 '12 at 14:31
    
So, from your view point, is my way of going about this bad programming practice? –  mino Feb 18 '12 at 17:09

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