Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently working on creating an overloaded function for the == operator. I am creating an hpp file for my linked list and I can't seem to get this operator working in the hpp file.

I currently have this:

template <typename T_>
class sq_list 
{

bool operator == ( sq_list & lhs, sq_list & rhs) 
{
    return *lhs == *rhs;
};

reference operator * ()     {
        return _c;
    };

};
}

I get about 10 errors but they pretty much repeat as errors:

C2804: binary 'operator ==' has too many parameters
C2333:'sq_list::operator ==' : error in function declaration; skipping function body
C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '*'
C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

I've tried changing things around but I constanly get the same errors as above

Any tips or assistance on this is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
You need sqlist<T> –  Flexo Feb 18 '12 at 0:55
    
And if it's a member function it takes one art and uses this –  Flexo Feb 18 '12 at 0:56
    
@awoodland: No, you don't; inside a class template definition, the template name alone can refer to the current template instance. And there's no T in the OP's code anyway. –  Kerrek SB Feb 18 '12 at 0:58
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The member operator only has one argument, which is the other object. The first object is the instance itself:

template <typename T_>
class sq_list 
{
    bool operator == (sq_list & rhs) const // don't forget "const"!!
    {
        return *this == *rhs;  // doesn't actually work!
    }
};

This definition doesn't actually make sense, since it just calls itself recursively. Instead, it should be calling some member operation, like return this->impl == rhs.impl;.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You are declaring the == overload as part of the class definition, as a method instances will get. Thus, the first parameter you request, lhs, is already implicit: remember, within an instance's methods you have access to this.

class myClass {
    bool operator== (myClass& other) {
        // Returns whether this equals other
    }
}

The operator==() method as part of a class should be understood as "this object knows how to compare itself to others".

You can overload operator==() outside the class to receive two arguments, both objects being compared, if that makes more sense to you. See here: http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/94-overloading-the-comparison-operators/

share|improve this answer
add comment

http://courses.cms.caltech.edu/cs11/material/cpp/donnie/cpp-ops.html

The comparison operators are very simple. Define == first, using a function signature like this:

  bool MyClass::operator==(const MyClass &other) const {
    ...  // Compare the values, and return a bool result.
  }

HOW to compare MyClass objects is all your own.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.