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Is there a way to suppress the output from popen() without losing the Wait().

Test 1:

FILE * stream = NULL;
char buffer [120];

stream = popen ("ffmpeg -y -i test.amr -ar 16000 test.wav -v quiet", "r");

while (fgets (buffer, sizeof(buffer), stream))
{
}

pclose (stream);

Test 2:

FILE * stream = NULL;
char buffer [120];

stream = popen ("ffmpeg -y -i test.amr -ar 16000 test.wav -v quiet &> /dev/null", "r");

while (fgets (buffer, sizeof(buffer), stream))
{
}

pclose (stream);

The problem with Test 2 is that pclose() is not waiting for the pipe to finish processing. I don't want to have a bunch of FFMPEG output every time I have to do a pipe.

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Sorry, I don't see the problem in the code. Could you post the actual output, describe the desired output, etc.? We programmers need input and output pipes too :) –  uʍop ǝpısdn Feb 18 '12 at 1:17
2  
Could ffmpeg be writing to stderr for some reason ? Could you try ffmpeg ... 2> /dev/null ? –  cnicutar Feb 18 '12 at 1:18
    
@cnicutar Thanks 2> solved the issue! –  Juan Gabriel Calderón-Pérez Feb 18 '12 at 1:23
    
For future reference: &> redirects both standard-output and standard-error. To redirect only standard-output, use > or 1>; to redirect only standard-error, use 2>, as cnicutar suggested. –  ruakh Feb 18 '12 at 1:28
    
&> is nonstandard and should not be used. The standard way to redirect both is >/dev/null 2>&1 –  R.. Feb 18 '12 at 1:57
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should only use popen() when you want to send data to, or read data from, the child process (and that is an exclusive-or; if you want to do both, you have to set up the connection yourself).

If you don't want to do that, don't use popen().

As jim mcnamara accurately explained, given that you redirect the output of the child to /dev/null after the pipe is created, the redirection closes the pipe input to your program, so popen() gets zero bytes to read, which counts as EOF. And it returns - there is nothing more for it to read (if there might be more for it, it would not have received EOF).

In this context, use system(); it will wait for the child to finish - even when the output of the child is redirected to /dev/null. In other contexts, it might be appropriate to use the lower-level fork() and exec*() routines instead.

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output to /dev/null means that popen (which is calling read() ) does not block on a closed file descriptor for stdout. It returns right away.

You effectively closed stdout by redirecting it (dup() ), in reality it returns EOF

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