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I need an application/service which runs in the background and generate bills on a particular date of every month. I went through many articles explaining the difference between Windows Service and Scheduled task Application and came to a conclusion that an application would suit my scenario.

Having said this, I wonder if I need to use Multi-threading in my application as I understand Multi-threading is basically to create a responsive UI while doing long running tasks but since my application will have no UI , do I need to have multi-threading actually?

Is there any difference in performance for a single threaded application to get the data from various sources (say database,webservice) and a multi-threaded application where we distribute each task to a thread and finally integrate all the output?

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How does WPF fit into this at all? –  Reed Copsey Feb 18 '12 at 1:43
    
@Reed Copsey, thanks, even a console app would do but my question is about Multithreading is really necessary? –  Coder323 Feb 18 '12 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Typically, an application like this will have no user interface at all, in which case your rationale for multi-threading may be meaningless in this case.

That being said, whether or not to use multiple threads for processing your data is another issue entirely. You could, if it makes sense to do so. If this is an application that's going to run once per month, it may be just as easy to leave it single threaded, as there's likely not a time constraint for completion.

If you need to process the items quickly, though, it may make sense to thread portions of the application.

Is there any difference in performance for a single threaded application to get the data from various sources (say database,webservice) and a multi-threaded application where we distribute each task to a thread and finally integrate all the output?

Typically, yes. That's the most common reason to introduce threading - it allows you to do more work in less time. It does add a fair amount of complexity (depends on the scenario), however.

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Thanks for your answer, even if I distribute each task to each thread , finally the main thread have to wait until all the threads complete to integrate it right? –  Coder323 Feb 18 '12 at 1:51
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@Coder323 Typically, yes - it completely depends on your design, though. You might want to take a look at: reedcopsey.com/series/parallelism-in-net4 –  Reed Copsey Feb 18 '12 at 1:53
    
+1. Start with single thread if it is ok for your case . "Is there any difference in performance..." could easily end up to be faster for single thread version if not done right. Deadlocks are much easier to run into in multiple thread case and they will not make it any faster :). –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 18 '12 at 1:54
    
@AlexeiLevenkov, Im sorry for not able to get you, are you saying that there wont be any difference in performance but just a poor design will cause multithreading more problems? –  Coder323 Feb 18 '12 at 1:59
    
@Coder323 He's saying to start single threaded, and only add threading if you find you really need it. It's easy to mess things up, and even make things slower, by adding multithreaded sections (if you do it wrong), as writing multithreaded code is tough. –  Reed Copsey Feb 18 '12 at 2:07

You would, presumably, get a faster response time from a multi-threaded program if these two cases are true: You have a multi core processor, which almost everyone does these days. Pulling data from all of your sources could be done in any order, and accessing that source with one thread would not lock it up from another.

The best reason to use multiple threads in this cause would be if you spend a lot of time blocking; waiting for something else to respond. If you're reading tons of data from your hard drive as fast as the disk can give it, then having two threads that read data shouldn't give you anything faster. In fact, I think it would be a bit slower. But if you're getting a lot of data from, say, sockets (the internet), and your threads spend a fair amount of time waiting for external servers to respond (and you're not using all of your bandwidth), then a multi threaded program would give you a boost in speed.

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you are right about the two cases. Though it wont lock it up from one another, I am afraid I have to use a separate thread to integrate all those task threads. –  Coder323 Feb 18 '12 at 2:01

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