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I have a question regarding the std::sort algorithm. Here is my test code:

struct MyTest
{
    int m_first;
    int m_second;

    MyTest(int first = 0, int second = 0) : m_first(first), m_second(second)
    {
    }
};


int main(int argc,char *argv[])
{
    std::vector<MyTest> myVec;
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
    	myVec.push_back(MyTest(i, i + 1));
    }


    //Sort the vector in descending order on m_first without using stand alone function or functors


    return 0;

}

Is it possible to sort the vector on the variable m_first without using any stand alone functions or functors? Also, please note that I am not using boost.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Yes, so long as the value type in the range to be sorted has an operator < that defines a "strict weak ordering", that is to say, it can be used to compare two MyTest instances correctly. You might do something like:

class MyTest
{
  ...
  bool operator <(const MyTest &rhs) const
  {
    return m_first<rhs.m_first;
  }
};
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this isn't valid C++ code. it has to return bool or something else –  the_drow Jun 1 '09 at 7:54
    
oops fixed up now –  1800 INFORMATION Jun 1 '09 at 7:59
    
thanks for the answer..but if in future if I want to sort on m_second then I have to provide the functor. Is that correct? –  Naveen Jun 1 '09 at 8:26
    
If you need to perform some kind of sort one way now, and a sort on a different set of data at some other time, then you can also specify a functor for comparison. In that case the functor is used, instead of the built-in, so there is no conflict between the two. I'd suggest that if you need to, then you should probably remove the comparison operator in order to remove the possibility of confusion for client code –  1800 INFORMATION Jun 1 '09 at 8:39
    
A doubt on this old question: the question says "descending order" but all answers seem to do a normal less than comparison only, which I believe will result in an ascending order sort. Am I missing something or are the answers just focussing on the more difficult part here? –  sundar Aug 4 '13 at 19:28

Write an operator< for your struct. This is the default function used by sort and the easiest way to allow it to function on your custom data structures.

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Define the operator<

struct MyTest
{
...
    bool operator<(const MyTest& a_test) const {
        return m_first < a_test.m_first;
    }
};
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The operator should only take one parameter and compare against "this". –  sth Jun 1 '09 at 7:58
    
Yes, fixed, thanks! –  Igor Krivokon Jun 1 '09 at 8:03

It is possible to do it with a member function but the stand alone function is the way to go.

bool operator <(const MyTest &lhs, const MyTest &rhs)
{
    return lhs.m_first<rhs.m_first;
}

Why ..

Scott Meyers: How Non-Member Functions Improve Encapsulation

If you're writing a function that can be implemented as either a member or as a non-friend non-member, you should prefer to implement it as a non-member function. That decision increases class encapsulation. When you think encapsulation, you should think non-member functions.

Surprised? Read on

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You should define an operator< in MyTest and it should look like this:

bool operator<(const MyTest &other) const {
  return m_first < other.m_first;
};
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http://ideone.com/3QLtP

This defines no operator <, but does define functor.

However, it's fun to travel through time or compilation process.

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