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I've got something like this in my property/accessor method of a constructor for my program.

using System;


namespace BusinessTrips
{
    public class Expense
    {
        private string paymentMethod;


        public Expense()
        { 
        }
        public Expense(string pmtMthd)
        {               
            paymentMethod = pmtMthd;


        }   


      //This is where things get problematic
        public string PaymentMethod
        {
            get    
            {
                return paymentMethod;
            }
            set
            {
                if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(" "))
                    paymentMethod = "~~unspecified~~";
                else paymentMethod = value;
            }
        }



    }
}

When a new attribute is entered, for PaymentMethod, which is null or a space, this clearly does not work. Any ideas?

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if you want to represent your 'business logic' inside the constructor, just rewrite direct field value (trip = ) assingnment with property setter call (Trip = ) –  Mikant Feb 18 '12 at 5:59
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

do you perhaps just need to replace string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(" ") with string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value) ?


From your posted code, you need to call:

this.PaymentMethod = pmtMthd;

instead of

paymentMethod = pmtMthd;

The capital p will use your property instead of the string directly. This is why it's a good idea to use this. when accessing class variables. In this case, it's the capital not the this. that makes the difference, but I'd get into the habit of using this.

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I just tried it, no dice. –  user1200789 Feb 18 '12 at 5:39
    
@user1200789: we need to see more code then. there's not enough information here to tell us what the problem is. how do you know it's not working? are you using the debugger to check the value, or are you writing it to the console...? –  Mark Feb 18 '12 at 5:42
    
Running it through the console, I've added everything. –  user1200789 Feb 18 '12 at 5:49
    
@user1200789 found your problem, updated my answer. Let me know if it worked and accept this as an answer if it did :) –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Feb 18 '12 at 6:02
    
@user1200789 works for me when I change the paymentMethod in one of the constructors to a blank, null, or space string –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Feb 18 '12 at 6:07
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Jean-Barnard Pellerin's answer is correct.

But here is the full code, which I tested in LinqPad to show that it works.

    public class Foo {
        private string _paymentMethod = "~~unspecified~~"; 
        public string PaymentMethod
        {
            get    
            {
                return _paymentMethod;
            }
            set
            {
                if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value))
                    _paymentMethod = "~~unspecified~~";
                else _paymentMethod = value;
            }
        }
}

With a main of:

void Main()
{
    var f = new Foo();
    f.PaymentMethod = "";
    Console.WriteLine(f.PaymentMethod);
    f.PaymentMethod = " ";
    Console.WriteLine(f.PaymentMethod);
    f.PaymentMethod = "FooBar";
    Console.WriteLine(f.PaymentMethod);
}

Output from console:

~~unspecified~~
~~unspecified~~
FooBar
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