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Am I mistaking what .prototype is supposed to do, or is this just not working??

window.dump = function () {
    for (var i = 0, x = dump.list.length; i < x; ++i) console.log.apply(this, dump.list[i]);
    if (arguments.length && typeof arguments[0] === 'boolean' && arguments[0]) dump.purge();
}
dump.prototype = {
    list : [],
    log : function () {
        dump.list.push(arguments);
    },
    purge : function () {
        dump.list = [];
    }
}
dump.log('test1');
dump.log('test2');
dump();

I expect "test1" and "test2" to be passed through console.log, instead dump.log is not defined. However dump.prototype.log is.

edit: I've tried the following, and I just can't seem to get this prototype thing right.

window.dump = new function () {
    this.list = [];
    this.log = function () {
        this.list.push(arguments);
    }
    this.purge = function () {
        return this.list = [];
    }
    return function () {
        for (var i = 0, x = this.list.length; i < x; ++i) console.log.apply(this, this.list[i]);
        if (arguments.length && typeof arguments[0] === 'boolean' && arguments[0]) this.purge();
    }
}

I guess what I'm asking is, what is the correct way to be able to use my code as follows?

dump.log('test1');
dump.log('test2');
dump();

edit: Here's a final result thanks to Matthew Flaschen, for anyone who's interested in building from it.

(function () {
    var console_log = Function.prototype.bind.call(console.log, console);
    window.dump = function () {
        for (var i = 0, x = dump.list.length; i < x; ++i) console_log.apply(this, dump.list[i]);
        if (arguments.length && typeof arguments[0] === 'boolean' && arguments[0]) dump.purge();
    };
    dump.list = [];
    dump.log = function () {
        dump.list.push(arguments);
    }
    dump.purge = function () {
        dump.list = [];
    }
})();

I've had to assign console_log to wrap console.log, because apparently console is not a standard object. Therefore it is not a standard Function object with the apply method. Proof that I do actually use Google.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, a correct version would be the below. dumper is a constructor function. Thus, it initializes the list member.

Below, we set the dumper prototype with the desired methods. These can also use this. Any instance of dumper (such as d) will have these methods.

window.dumper = function () {
    this.list = [];
};

dumper.prototype = {

    log : function () {
        this.list.push(arguments);
    },
    purge : function () {
        this.list = [];
    },
    dump : function () {
        for (var i = 0, x = this.list.length; i < x; ++i) console.log.apply(this, this.list[i]);
        if (arguments.length && typeof arguments[0] === 'boolean' && arguments[0]) this.purge();
    }
}


var d = new dumper();        

d.log('test1');
d.log('test2');
d.dump();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 you beat me to it! –  maerics Feb 18 '12 at 6:30
    
there is no way to actually use "d" as the dump function? –  Shea Feb 18 '12 at 6:32
    
@andrewjackson, probably if you make dump a singleton. But that defeats the whole point of using prototype. Don't try to fight the JavaScript object model unless you have to. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 18 '12 at 6:36
    
I don't want to be a pain, but do you have an example of what a singleton would look like, that would make this possible? just for informational purposes... –  Shea Feb 18 '12 at 6:43
1  
@andrewjackson, like this. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 18 '12 at 6:47

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