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C++ says that to create a copy constructor for a class that uses composition, the compiler recursively calls the copy constructors for all the member objects. I tried that same thing in the below code:

class A
{
public:
    A(){cout<<"A constructor called"<<endl;}
    A(const A&){cout<<"A copy constructor called"<<endl;}
};

class B
{
public:
    B(){cout<<"B constructor called"<<endl;}
    B(const B&){cout<<"B copy constructor called"<<endl;}
};

class C
{
    A a;
    B b;
public:
    C(){cout<<"C constructor called"<<endl;}
    C(const C&){cout<<"C copy constructor called"<<endl;}// If you comment this line, you will get output: Case 1 (see below)     and if you don't comment, you will get o/p: case 2(see below)
};


void main()
{
    C c;
    cout<<endl;
    C c2 = c;
}`

Case 1:

A constructor called

B constructor called

C constructor called

A copy constructor called

B copy constructor called

Case 2:

A constructor called

B constructor called

C constructor called

A constructor called

B constructor called

C copy constructor called

My doubt is that the o/p for case 2 should be: A, B, C, constructor called and then.. A, B, C copy constructor called. But it is not happening. Please help.

share|improve this question
    
Read about RVO too. – Nawaz Feb 18 '12 at 7:59
    
@ serge: I am geting A constructor called, B constructor called, C copy constructor called. – Jatin Feb 18 '12 at 8:01
up vote 9 down vote accepted

That would happen, except that you have provided your own copy constructor for C, which tells the compiler "don't provide the default copy constructor."

If you want your copy constructor to do the same thing that the implicitly defined copy constructor would do (along with your extra printing), you'd need to define it as follows:

C(const C& other)
    : a(other.a), b(other.b)
{
    std::cout << "C copy constructor called" << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

The standard is only explaining behavior for the default copy constructor. The default copy constructor is the one you're using when you comment out the copy constructor you wrote for C. If you write your own copy constructor you must explicitly copy any members you wish to copy, like so:

C( const C& c ) : a(c.a), b(c.b) {cout<<"C copy constructor called"<<endl;}

Obivously writing your own copy constructor is somewhat error prone, so it's best to rely on the default one whenever possible.

share|improve this answer

In both cases, C::C( C const &) copy constructor is called. When it is implicit, then it calls copy constructors of base classes. When it is explicit the way you define it, it calls default constructors of A and B. This is expected behavior. Note, C c2 = c; is equal to C c2(c);, there is no temporaries.

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