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I've written a program that must find the solution to a EulerProblem. I want to train my program skills that's why I've signed up on euler.

This is the problem:

A Pythagorean triplet is a set of three natural numbers, a < b < c, for which, a^2 + b^2 = c^2

For example, 3^2 + 4^2 = 9 + 16 = 25 = 5^2.

There exists exactly one Pythagorean triplet for which a + b + c = 1000. Find the product abc.

and this is my code, but it runs soo slow, it take hours to give me the right abc.

static int findTriplet(int getal)
{
    boolean test = false;
    for(int a = 1; !test; a++)
        for(int b = a+1; !test; b++)
            for(int c = b+1; !test; c++)
            {
                if( a*a + b*b == c*c)
                {
                    if(a+b+c == getal)
                    {
                        return (a*b*c);
                    }
                }

            }
    return 0;
}

Is it possible to make the code much faster or is it normal that it takes hours?

Kind regards,

EDIT:

Thanks for helping. The !test boolean was useless sorry for that, This works :

static int findTriplet(int getal)
{
    for(int a = 1; a < 1000; a++)
        for(int b = a+1; b < 1000; b++)
            for(int c = b+1; c < 1000; c++)
            {
                if( a*a + b*b == c*c)
                {
                    if(a+b+c == getal)
                    {
                        return (a*b*c);
                    }
                }

            }
    return 0;
}

I've also wrote a haskell variation that also does the trick.

Think this was easier in Haskell and more efficient.

Thaks for the tips.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using !test as your loop control expression? –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 18 '12 at 10:45
2  
Perhaps you could accept some answers to your past questions. –  Coren Feb 18 '12 at 10:45
6  
you're not breaking the innermost loop anywhere so it loops forever for a = 1, b = 2. –  soulcheck Feb 18 '12 at 10:45
    
That's the point of Euler - you'll find a naive/brute force solution that you can then improve. Try thinking about the problem differently. –  Drew Gibson Feb 18 '12 at 10:53
    
You can also improve further your code by using the fact (theorem) that any Pythagorean triplet (a,b,c) is equal to k*(m^2-n^2, 2mn, m^2+n^2), where k,m,n are integers and m,n have no common factor. So, 1000= a+b+c = k*(2m^2+2mn) = 2km(m+n). –  ypercube Feb 18 '12 at 11:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In order to optimize this naive algorithm, you have first to understand that :

  1. Your actual source code does not stop at all. It will run as long as test is false. You also take the risk to encounter an overflow of c.
  2. Trying every possible combination of a, b and c would result in trying 1000*999*988= 997 002 000 times (!).
  3. Key points in this algorithms are :
    • stop conditions in loops
    • ways to find next one to try
    • ways to reduce loops if possible

Now, you know that you need to :

  1. find ways to avoid the third loop, using conditions of your problems
  2. find ways to increment a and b more smartly, using conditions of your problems
  3. find ways to stop loops earlier, using conditions of your problems

Here are some hints for easy optimisations :

  • As amit & sirko said, you can guess c if you already know a and b.
  • You don't need to recompute a*a each time you're checking a new b
  • You don't need to check until a < 1000 and b < 999, there is far less possible combinations

And some hints for harder optimisations :

  • You don't need to recompute b*b each time too
  • You don't to need browse every possible combinations
share|improve this answer
2  
This question is tagged homework, as the tag wiki says: Don't ask for 'complete' solutions to the problem; we're not here to do your homework for you. Answers to homework tagged questions should not be full answers - but hints and guidelines. –  amit Feb 18 '12 at 10:57
    
This does not enforce a < b < c. –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 18 '12 at 10:58
    
I guess you're right. I'll correct this. –  Coren Feb 18 '12 at 10:59

The last for is redundant, you can find c = sqrt(a^2 + b^2), which will make your algorithm much faster.

Actually you will only have to check if there is a c in N [natural numbers] such that sqrt(a^2 + b^2) = c, and check if a+b+c == 1000

This optmization will make your solution O(n^2) instead O(n^3), 1000 times faster!

EDIT: As discussed in the comments:

  1. There could be a faster solution then checking c = sqrt(a^2 + b^2): c = 1000 - a -b, but the important part is doing it in O(n^2) and not O(n^3).
  2. This answer is more a guideline then a full answer. There is more work to be done on the stop conditions of your loop. The purpose of this answer is only to give you an idea how it can be done faster by magnitude.
share|improve this answer
2  
c = 1000 - a - b and then check whether a*a + b*b == c*c should be faster, though. –  Sirko Feb 18 '12 at 10:48
    
it will still increments b forever with a = 1 –  Coren Feb 18 '12 at 10:49
    
@Sirko: true, but not by magnitude. The important thing is eliminating the last loop, making the solution O(n^2) no matter how. –  amit Feb 18 '12 at 10:50
    
@Coren: This is a programming challange, I did not aim to give a full solution - just a direction how to make it much faster. –  amit Feb 18 '12 at 10:51
    
was just a comment to further improve your answer. not enough of a thought for an own one ,-) –  Sirko Feb 18 '12 at 10:51

Look at a tall, thin, right triangle, with base a, height b, and hypotenuse c. First a and b are always less that c, and c = sqrt(a*a+b*b) so as the other posters said, you only need to search over a and b. You also know that a+b >= c so there's no point in looking at small a,b pairs.

Now, suppose you start with a=0, b=500, so c==500, and the total perimeter is 1000. Now you increase a by 1 and calculate the perimeter. It will be a little more than 1000. Then you decrease b by 1. Then the perimeter will be a little less than 1000. Then increase a by 1 until perimeter is > 1000 again.

So, as long as the perimeter is <= 1000, increase a. As long as it is > 1000, decrease b. If it is equal to 1000, you've got one answer. Then keep going.

You only need to do this as long as a<b.

This algorithm should be O(N), because it doesn't waste time with small pairs.

Then all you have to do is prove to yourself that it won't miss any answers. You do that by assuming there's a valid a,b answer that it does miss, and show that's impossible.

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