Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Good afternoon all,

I have a string representing some polylines encoded using Google's Encoded Polyline Algorithm Format and I need to decode them to obtain the latitude and longitude.

There are 11 steps in the encoding scheme and I presume that to decode, I would work them backwards (I'm working with the example string `~oia@):

Step 11. Convert each char to its ASCII equivalent = 96 126 111 105 97 64

Step 10. Minus 63 to each value = 33 63 48 42 34 1

Step 9. Convert to chunks of 6-bits = 100001 111111 110000 101010 100010 000001

Step 8. Remove the sixth bit counting from the right = 00001 11111 10000 01010 00010 00001

Step 7. Reverse their order = 00001 00010 01010 10000 11111 00001

Step 6. Align them into chunks of 8 = 00000010 00100101 01000011 11100001

Step 5. If the original decimal value is negative, invert the bits...

But without knowledge of the original decimal value, how do we know if the original decimal value is positive/negative?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When encoding, we left shift the binary value by one bit and invert the bits if the number is negative,

This means that when decoding, if the last bit is a 0, the initial number is positive. If the last bit is a 1, the initial number is negative:

1  =>   00000010
2  =>   00000100
3  =>   00000110
4  =>   00001000
5  =>   00001010
6  =>   00001100
7  =>   00001110
8  =>   00010000

-1  =>  00000001
-2  =>  00000011
-3  =>  00000101
-4  =>  00000111
-5  =>  00001001
-6  =>  00001011
-7  =>  00001101
-8  =>  00001111

Full solution for decoding posted here for anyone interested:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        for (int point : Decode("_p~iF~ps|U_ulLnnqC_mqNvxq`@",10)) {
            System.out.println(point); // Be aware that point is in E5
        }
    }

    private static java.util.List<java.lang.Integer> Decode(String encoded_polylines, int initial_capacity) {
        java.util.List<java.lang.Integer> trucks = new java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Integer>(initial_capacity);
        int truck = 0;
        int carriage_q = 0;
        for (int x = 0, xx = encoded_polylines.length(); x < xx; ++x) {
            int i = encoded_polylines.charAt(x);
            i -= 63;
            int _5_bits = i << (32 - 5) >>> (32 - 5);
            truck |= _5_bits << carriage_q;
            carriage_q += 5;
            boolean is_last = (i & (1 << 5)) == 0;
            if (is_last) {
                boolean is_negative = (truck & 1) == 1;
                truck >>>= 1;
                if (is_negative) {
                    truck = ~truck;
                }
                trucks.add(truck);
                carriage_q = 0;
                truck = 0;
            }
        }
        return trucks;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Since this is a language-agnostic question, I will add this PHP solution (since the >>> operator does not exist in PHP) from Peter Chng's unitstep blog:

function decodePolylineToArray($encoded)
{
  $length = strlen($encoded);
  $index = 0;
  $points = array();
  $lat = 0;
  $lng = 0;

  while ($index < $length)
  {
    $b = 0;
    $shift = 0;
    $result = 0;
    do
    {
      $b = ord(substr($encoded, $index++)) - 63;
      $result |= ($b & 0x1f) << $shift;
      $shift += 5;
    }
    while ($b >= 0x20);
    $dlat = (($result & 1) ? ~($result >> 1) : ($result >> 1));
    $lat += $dlat;

    $shift = 0;
    $result = 0;
    do
    {
      $b = ord(substr($encoded, $index++)) - 63;
      $result |= ($b & 0x1f) << $shift;
      $shift += 5;
    }
    while ($b >= 0x20);

    $dlng = (($result & 1) ? ~($result >> 1) : ($result >> 1));
    $lng += $dlng;

    $points[] = array($lat * 1e-5, $lng * 1e-5);
  }
  return $points;
}

Additional instructions from Google developers

share|improve this answer
2  
While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. –  gunr2171 yesterday

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.