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i defined my own 24 bit data type like this

class _24bit{
        public byte[] _value = new byte[3]; 
   }

i have data in binary in a _24bit data array

 _24bit  []data = new _24bit

i declared my bitmap as

Bitmap b = new Bitmap(columns / 3, rows, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);

but when i declare this to get a row in the bitmap

_24bit *row = (_24bit *)bmd.Scan0 + (j * bmd.Stride);

i get this compile error

Cannot take the address of, get the size of, or declare a pointer to a managed type ('mynamespace._24bit')

How can i proceed with my own 24bit data type ?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You really can't declare pointers to managed reference types (and your _24bit class is managed reference type). Even if you declare _24bit as a struct (making it a value type), it still contains a reference to a byte array (not byte array itself, only a reference, which makes size of this struct larger than 24 bits). You can declare you array as fixed and unsafe to fix that. You also might need to specify StructLayout attribute:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1, Size=3)]
struct _24bpp
{
    public unsafe fixed byte _value[3];
}

Note, that you can only access content of this struct in unsafe context. Or drop array declaration at all:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1, Size=3)]
struct _24bpp
{
    public byte B;
    public byte G;
    public byte R;
}

Alternatively, you can recreate bitmap in terms of your data structures and copy data from unmanaged memory to your data structures. Something like

public static _24bit[][] GetBitmapPixelsFrom24bpp(BitmapData data)
{
    if(data == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("data");

    var bitmapRows = new _24bit[rows][];
    for(int row = 0; row < data.Height; ++r)
    {
        bitmapRows[row] = new _24bit[data.Width];
        for(int pixel = 0; pixel < data.Width; ++pixel)
        {
            byte b = Marshal.ReadByte(data.Scan0, data.Stride * row + pixel * 3 + 0);
            byte g = Marshal.ReadByte(data.Scan0, data.Stride * row + pixel * 3 + 1);
            byte r = Marshal.ReadByte(data.Scan0, data.Stride * row + pixel * 3 + 2);
            var bitmapPixel = new _24bit();
            bitmapPixel._value[0] = b;
            bitmapPixel._value[1] = g;
            bitmapPixel._value[2] = r;
            bitmapRows[row][pixel] = bitmapPixel;
        }
    }
    return bitmapRows;
}
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are sure the order is b g r and not R G B ? –  klijo Feb 18 '12 at 13:05
    
yes, Format24bppRgb is confusing, because it is really BGR byte order. –  max Feb 18 '12 at 13:07
    
i wanted a row pointer so that i could fill it with data, can i do that with your function? –  klijo Feb 18 '12 at 13:27
    
no, this function only reads data into managed memory and does not provide raw pointers. you need to change your _24bit class according to one of suggestions to do that. this function shows a concept how you could still work with the bitmap without changing your data type. –  max Feb 18 '12 at 14:03
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You cant initialize structure like Robert G. wrote.

Put your structure into class that initializes structure.

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_24bit is a managed reference type, getting a pointer to it would essentially be getting a pointer to a reference to some non-constant location on the heap, which isn't what you want.

Declare _24bit as a struct instead of a class and you'll be able to use pointers with it as long as it only contains unmanaged types. It's explained in more detail in this MSDN article.

struct _24bit
{
    public byte r, g, b;

    public byte this[int index]
    {
        switch (index)
        {
        case 0: return r;
        case 1: return g;
        case 2: return b;
        default: //throw exception or return 0 or something
        }
    }
}
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i did as you said but now i get this error message "cannot have instance field initializers in structs" –  klijo Feb 18 '12 at 12:46
    
C# structs act a bit differently than C/C++ structs, C# structs have a default constructor that initializes everything to it's default value and all constructors must inherit from that. You're also not allowed to initialize variables like you do in _24bit. So you have two options, either add a constructor public _24bit(byte unused) : this() { _value = new byte[3]; } or, a better solution, replace _value with byte r, g, b;. If you still want to use indexers with #2, use this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2549tw02.aspx –  Robert Rouhani Feb 18 '12 at 12:53
1  
It seems I also completely forgot about the fixed array... option #3, you can replace public byte _value = new byte[3]; with public fixed byte _value[3]; I also updated my answer to use my second option. –  Robert Rouhani Feb 18 '12 at 12:59
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Just rename your class to

class bmp24bit()
{
    public byte[] _value = new byte[3]; 
}
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