Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to plot this style -graph here scaled with proportions, is there some ready plot for that in R? Suppose I have nominal values per year in a matrix. With matplot(..), I can plot easily all nominal values. If I divide values by the aggregate sum, I do not get them scaled but jammed up so I would have to adjust things in that case. Better, is there something such as a pkg that could do that kind of allocation analysis directly perhaps in a report -form?

I want an area plot for the following data where XN is time X1 is step 1, X2 is step 2 --. Now there are about 60 vars. How can I create an proportional area plot for that?

> head(b)
        X0       X1       X2       X3       X4       X5       X6
1  2803.30  2698.05  2428.24  2000.00  3917.54  4575.02  2656.00
2   227.46   220.68   200.00    30.00   220.43    30.00    30.00
3   855.33   824.54   700.00    30.00   242.52  1190.70  1906.01
4  2777.37  2764.57  1265.66  3326.28  4094.00  7049.84 10726.76
5    60.50    59.60     1.00    30.00    30.00    30.00    82.67
6 14548.16 14548.16 14664.79 19855.44 24674.03 23414.45 14973.54
> dput(head(b))
structure(list(X0 = c(2803.3, 227.46, 855.33, 2777.37, 60.5, 
14548.16), X1 = c(2698.05, 220.68, 824.54, 2764.57, 59.6, 14548.16
), X2 = c(2428.24, 200, 700, 1265.66, 1, 14664.79), X3 = c(2000, 
30, 30, 3326.28, 30, 19855.44), X4 = c(3917.54, 220.43, 242.52, 
4094, 30, 24674.03), X5 = c(4575.02, 30, 1190.7, 7049.84, 30, 
23414.45), X6 = c(2656, 30, 1906.01, 10726.76, 82.67, 14973.54
)), .Names = c("X0", "X1", "X2", "X3", "X4", "X5", "X6"), row.names = c(NA, 
6L), class = "data.frame")

Related questions

  1. Making a stacked area plot using ggplot2
  2. Getting a stacked area plot in R
share|improve this question
2  
Why are financial charts so garish? Minimalism (Apple excepted, I guess) and the work of Tufte seems to have been ignored by the financial sector. That web page is full of macho-graphics. If there were more women in finance.... –  Spacedman Feb 18 '12 at 14:35
    
That's an area plot. –  hadley Feb 18 '12 at 15:54
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you had a matrix you could first apply cumsum to the columns and divide the result by sum applied to the columns. The final result could be given back to matplot. I suspect you could do the entire transformation in one step with sweep, but I'm not particularly facile with that function.

This would be a matplot solution (I originally had this by columns but your data was arranged differently than I expected):

matplot(t(apply(b, 1, function(x) cumsum(x)/sum(x) )),type="l")

If you go to the R Graphics library you can often find plots that do your particular desires. In this case it looks as though the conditional density plot by Zeileis in package vcd may be a good fit:

http://addictedtor.free.fr/graphiques/RGraphGallery.php?graph=120

share|improve this answer
    
colSums(b[1:7,]/colSums(b[1:7,])) ...why does this not return 1 1 1 1 ...? Irritating this sum(b[1:7,][1]/22772.12) does as expected. There is something wrong in dividing by colSums... –  hhh Feb 18 '12 at 18:23
    
I said to use cumsum with sum. Otherwise I don't see how you would get the proportions to work out correctly. –  BondedDust Feb 18 '12 at 22:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.