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I have a mysql database, I want to select all values that are equal on "name" and "postcode". And the query needs to select the most common data in the other fields.

If I have:

name postcode test  test2
a    a        1     2
a    a        1     2
a    a        2     1
a    a        1     1
a    a        1     1

Then this needs to return

a    a        1     1

Because (test)1 is 4 times in the table, and (test2)1 is there 3 times. So I need the most common data in the Column where the name and the postcode is the same.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is my first approach:

select distinct
    name, 
    postcode, 
    (select 
       s.test
    from 
       your_table s
    where
       name s.name = m.name, s.postcode = m.postcode
    group by 
       s.name, s.postcode, s.test
    order by count(*) desc
    limit 1 ) as test,
    (select 
       s.test2
    from 
       your_table s
    where
       name s.name = m.name, s.postcode = m.postcode
    group by 
       s.name, s.postcode, s.test2
    order by  count(*) desc
    limit 1 ) as test2
from your_table m

If you don't need high performance this is a solution. If this query is often performed then you should look for another approach.

EDITED

If you need more performance and also you need distinct rows, you can remove distinct and append group by name, postcode clause at the end of the query. Query looks like:

select ... group by name, postcode

This is not standard SQL but mysql allow this for better performance:

Quoting MySQL doc:

In standard SQL, a query that includes a GROUP BY clause cannot refer to nonaggregated columns in the select list that are not named in the GROUP BY clause. MySQL extends the use of GROUP BY so that the select list can refer to nonaggregated columns not named in the GROUP BY clause. This means that the preceding query is legal in MySQL. You can use this feature to get better performance by avoiding unnecessary column sorting and grouping.

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1  
Probably should order by count(*) DESC, and find a way to return only one row per name+postcode combination. –  Andomar Feb 18 '12 at 15:15
    
But the limit would only affect the subqueries, the outer query will still return multiple rows with name=a and postcode=a. Steven Schroeder seems to have a solution. –  Andomar Feb 18 '12 at 15:39
    
ok, fixed with distinct reserved word. –  danihp Feb 18 '12 at 16:56
    
Distinct works on the entire row, including the subquery columns. So the subqueries would be evaluted multiple times per name, postcode combination, before eventually being filtered out by the distinct. –  Andomar Feb 18 '12 at 17:23
    
Fixed,I have reread question and OP doesn't ask for distinct rows neither high performance. –  danihp Feb 18 '12 at 18:34
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When you wrote "I need the most common data" I am interpreting this to mean that you are looking for the mode average value which is simply the number which occurs most frequently in the column for the specified grouping. This can be achieved by grouping and then sorting by the count descending and picking the first result.

e.g.,

SELECT t.name
       ,t.postcode
       ,modevaluefortest = 
           (SELECT t2.test
              FROM [table] t2
             WHERE t.name = t2.name AND t.postcode = t2.postcode
             GROUP BY name, postcode, test
             ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC
             LIMIT 1
             )
       ,modevaluefortest2 = 
           (SELECT t2.test2
              FROM [table] t2
             WHERE t.name = t2.name AND t.postcode = t2.postcode
             GROUP BY name, postcode, test2
             ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC
             LIMIT 1
             )
  FROM [table] t
 WHERE t.name = t.postcode -- all values that are equal on "name" and "postcode"
 GROUP BY t.name, t.postcode
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+1 One potential problem, for a a 1 1 a a 2 2 it could return 1 2 because both 1 1 and 2 2 occur once, and there's no other discriminator –  Andomar Feb 18 '12 at 15:40
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