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I'm seeing a huge memory leak in a program I'm building using WPF. I've written a small example app which seems to replicate this issue on a smaller scale.

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        images = Directory.GetFiles("C:\\Photos", "*.jpg", 
                                                  SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly);
        foreach (string image in images)
        {
            Window1 window = new Window1(image);
            window.Show();
            window.Close();
        }
    }
}

The Window1 XAML . . .

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1"
    AllowsTransparency="True"
    WindowStyle="None"
    Background="White"
    Opacity="1.0"
<Grid>
    <Image Name="pb_Image"/>
</Grid>

. . . and the Window1 code

public Window1(string image)
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        BitmapImage bi = new BitmapImage(new Uri(image, UriKind.Absolute));
        bi.Freeze();
        pb_Image.Source = bi;
        pb_Image.Height = bi.Height;
        pb_Image.Width = bi.Width;
    }

It repeatedly shows and then closes a window which contains a BitmapImage however an "out of memory exception" occurs very quickly so I'm obviously doing something wrong and hoping someone can point it out!

* Update *

After playing around for a while I've isolated the issue, this causes a memory leak:

foreach (string image in images)
        {
            Window1 window = new Window1(image);
            window.Show();
            window.Close();
        }

and this doesn't

foreach (string image in images)
        {
            Window1 window = new Window1("C:\\Photos\\photo1.jpg");
            window.Show();
            window.Close();
        }

Puzzling - any ideas???

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3  
Taskmgr is a very imperfect memory profiler, both the garbage collector and the Windows memory manager are far too sophisticated to be second-guessed by a single number. Prove that you have a real problem by running this code a million times. –  Hans Passant Feb 18 '12 at 15:29
    
I've update my code to hopefully more accurately show what is happening. I suspect that my original scaled down code was not accurately reproducing the issue I am experiencing. –  Gavimoss Feb 18 '12 at 16:51
    
check this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/568408/… –  Davide Piras Feb 18 '12 at 16:56
    
@DavidePiras thanks but I'm not sure what managed resources need to be disposed of and how I would do that. –  Gavimoss Feb 18 '12 at 17:12
    
What is pb_Image? –  Phil Feb 18 '12 at 17:32

2 Answers 2

Once you've close the window you still have a reference to the window object. You need to set window to null after you've closed it.

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Thanks but I tried that and the window still stays in memory –  Gavimoss Feb 18 '12 at 15:27
    
Removing all references to the window (e.g. setting window = null) only makes the Window1 instance eligible for garbage collection. If and when it is collected and it's resources released is controlled by the garbage collector. Create a million windows as Hans Passant suggest and then see if resources are leaking. –  Martin Liversage Feb 18 '12 at 15:36
    
I think my scaled down code isn't reflecting the issue I'm actually having so I've updated it to show more accurately what is happening. –  Gavimoss Feb 18 '12 at 16:53
    
You've remembered to Freeze the bitmap, so I don't see any problems in your code (unless you images have a very high resolution, e.g. 10,000 x 10,000). As Martin and Hans, stated TaskManager is not good for any kind of memory profiling. I've used Redgates Ants memory profiler in the past, and I've found it easy to use, I suggest you download the trail version, in order to identify what exactly is causing your memory leak. –  Terkel Feb 18 '12 at 18:40
    
@Gavimoss The best is to go for sos.dll. Run a dumpheap -stat when your program starts, leave it running for a while and run another dumpheap -stat. This will give you a clear indication of where the memory is used. –  GETah Feb 19 '12 at 0:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure exactly why the above memory leak is occurring as from what I can determine, everything looks right.

I did manage to find this excellent tutorial on "WPF Multithreading - Using the BackgroundWorker and Reporting the Progress to the UI" which was easily adapted to cycle through and display a set of images without any kind of memory leak issues.

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