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asm_execve.s:

.section .data
file_to_run:
.ascii       "/bin/sh"

.section .text
.globl main

main:
    pushl %ebp
    movl %esp, %ebp
    subl $0x8, %esp         # array of two pointers. array[0] = file_to_run  array[1] = 0

    movl file_to_run, %edi
    movl %edi, -0x4(%ebp)   
    movl $0, -0x8(%ebp)

    movl $11, %eax                      # sys_execve
    movl file_to_run, %ebx              # file to execute       
    leal -4(%ebp), %ecx                 # command line parameters
    movl $0, %edx                       # environment block
    int  $0x80              

    leave
    ret

makefile:

NAME = asm_execve
$(NAME) : $(NAME).s
    gcc -o $(NAME) $(NAME).s

Program is executed, but sys_execve is not called:

alex@alex32:~/project$ make
gcc -o asm_execve asm_execve.s
alex@alex32:~/project$ ./asm_execve 
alex@alex32:~/project$ 

Expected output is:

alex@alex32:~/project$ ./asm_execve 
$ exit
alex@alex32:~/project$

This Assembly program is supposed to work like the following C code:

char *data[2];
data[0] = "/bin/sh"; 
data[1] = NULL;
execve(data[0], data, NULL);

Something wrong in system call parameters?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The execve system call is being called, but you are indeed passing it bad parameters.

(You can see this by running your executable using strace.)

There are three problems:

  1. .ascii does not 0-terminate the string. (You might get lucky, as there is nothing following it in your .data section in this example, but that's not guaranteed...) Add a 0, or use .asciz (or .string) instead.

  2. movl file_to_run, %edi moves the value pointed to by the file_to_run symbol into %edi, i.e. the first 4 bytes of the string (0x6e69622f). The address of the string is just the value of the symbol itself, so you need to use the $ prefix for literal values: movl $file_to_run, %edi. Similarly, you need to say movl $file_to_run, %ebx a few lines further down. (This is a common source of confusion between AT&T syntax and Intel syntax!)

  3. The parameters are placed on the stack in the wrong order: -0x8(%ebp) is a lower address than -0x4(%ebp). So the address of the command string should be written to -0x8(%ebp), the 0 should be written to -0x4(%ebp), and the leal instruction should be leal -8(%ebp), %ecx.


Fixed code:

.section .data
file_to_run:
.asciz       "/bin/sh"

.section .text
.globl main

main:
    pushl %ebp
    movl %esp, %ebp
    subl $0x8, %esp         # array of two pointers. array[0] = file_to_run  array[1] = 0

    movl $file_to_run, %edi
    movl %edi, -0x8(%ebp)   
    movl $0, -0x4(%ebp)

    movl $11, %eax                      # sys_execve
    movl $file_to_run, %ebx              # file to execute       
    leal -8(%ebp), %ecx                 # command line parameters
    movl $0, %edx                       # environment block
    int  $0x80              

    leave
    ret
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