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In most tutorials (Judith Bishops' book, or here), I see example similar to the one below.

If the builder pattern means to create method Construct in Director class, which performs set of Builder childs operations...

class Director {
  public static void Construct(Builder builder) {
    builder.BuildPartA();
    builder.BuildPartB();
    ...
  }
}

abstract class Builder {
  public abstract void BuildPartA();
  public abstract void BuildPartB();
  ...
}

class Builder1 : Builder { ... }
class Builder2 : Builder { ... }

void Main() {
  Builder1 b1 = new Builder1();
  Builder2 b2 = new Builder2();
  Director.Construct(b1);
  Director.Construct(b2);
}

...why don't we just move the Construct method to the Builder class?

class Builder {
  public virtual void BuildPartA();
  public virtual void BuildPartB();
  public void Construct() {
    BuildPartA();
    BuildPartB();
    ...
  }
  ...
}

class Builder1 : Builder { ... }
class Builder2 : Builder { ... }

void Main() {
  Builder1 b1 = new Builder1();
  Builder2 b2 = new Builder2();
  b1.Construct();
  b2.Construct();
}

Please show me some example where the builder pattern is really helpful.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure if I used this pattern so far, but it looks like the idea is to permit the builder to be implemented separate from its definition, thus permitting the existence of any number of different builders totally independent of the director class that's using them. – rid Feb 18 '12 at 22:27
    
@Radu: but the Director class is not independent to the Builder: it uses the Builder class in the parameter of Construct. – Jan Turoň Feb 18 '12 at 22:31
    
True, it uses a builder, but it does not have to know how the builder is implemented. It only knows the public interface. Likewise, the builder doesn't need to know about the details of the classes using it. – rid Feb 18 '12 at 22:33
    
But for what purpose we separate the Construct and why do we create Director class? Sure, we can lately implement another Builder, which can be used the same way by Director. But if we have Construct inherited in every child Builder, we can do the same (and more) in a simpler way. – Jan Turoň Feb 18 '12 at 22:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

See this video: http://www.johnlindquist.com/search/label/builder%20pattern

share|improve this answer
    
So if those builders are reusable objects and we want them to perform specific set of operations only at one place, it would mess their code with method that is used only once, so it is better maintainable to separate these operations into custom class and that is the purpose of Director. This would be very good reason for the Builder pattern. Did I get the point? – Jan Turoň Feb 20 '12 at 11:06
    
Well, imagine in the context of the example in the video...let's say we are building a map, but because the player has no more tools for mining, the game does not output "resources" on the map since the user cannot access them. Why put the logic about whether to add resources to the map in each builder, when that logic can reside in the director, who tells the current builder whether to output resources, or not. – arieljake Feb 21 '12 at 7:14
1  
@arieljake : link is not working. I understand its too old but just FYI. – user2463514 Jan 24 '14 at 13:09

The Directory is supposed to know the correct sequence of assembling different components to construct the objects. I believe it is simply to separate the concern of knowing the order or method of constructing these objects from the base Builder class (which is simply a base class). If you moved the construct into the Builder base it would resemble the template method pattern.

It is better to have a separate director that knows how to assemble the components because in the even that the "recipe" of constructing the components changes, the base class does not need to be changed. For example, let's say a certain class of components need to be built by executing 3 steps in a certain order:

  1. Step A
  2. Step B
  3. Step C

Let's say at some point another component is added to the family which can be built with the same steps but in a different order:

  1. Step A
  2. Step C
  3. Step B

In this case, if the logic for the sequence is separated in the Director as opposed to the base class Builder, one can inherit a new director and use that to construct. If the logic was in the base Builder, the base class, which may be a part of a separate library or JAR or a header file in case of C++, it may have required recompilation of the concrete classes or at least shipping a new JAR.

I'm sure there are more advantages of separating such a concern.

share|improve this answer
    
But why to separate the Builder logic? The Director doesn't have access to private Builder members and it makes the code more difficult to understand... Sorry if I don't get it: could you please provide some clarifying example? – Jan Turoň Feb 18 '12 at 22:38
    
@JanTuroň See my update to the answer – Sid Feb 18 '12 at 22:49
    
+1 since the need for extra recompilation could be a reason sometimes. But still, the extra complexity for the builder pattern is too high price for me. – Jan Turoň Feb 18 '12 at 23:01
    
@JanTuroň That is your choice and privilege :) But I believe the reasons for having a separate Director as per the GoF are what I mentioned above. – Sid Feb 18 '12 at 23:21

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