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In my C++ code I'm keeping a pointer to an object which should be created lazily, i.e., created only upon request. I have following code, which is clearly not thread-safe.

LAZY* get_lazy()
{
    if (0 == _lazy)
        _lazy = create_lazy();
    return _lazy;
}

I wonder what kind of synchronization should I use here? I know Boost.thread provides supports for one-time initialization. But I'm hoping that there is a simple solution using TBB + C++ only. I should also note that...

  • I cannot create _lazy as a static object (I actually want to keep an unbounded array of such lazily created objects)
  • Such LAZY objects cannot be over-allocated (creation is very expensive)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need a local mutex (tbb::mutex), to be sure you create your lazy object only once.

#include <tbb/mutex.h>

tbb::atomic<LAZY*> _lazy;
tbb::mutex myMutex;

LAZY* GetLazy()
{
  if (0 == _lazy)
  {
    myMutex.lock();
    if (0 == _lazy)
        _lazy = create_lazy();
    myMutex.unlock();
  }
  return _lazy;
}
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In this case, I imagine it will be still okay if I declare myMutex to be a static variable inside GetLazy(). I'm I right? –  ssquidd Feb 18 '12 at 23:53
    
Constructors of static function variables aren't thread-safe, so you definitely shouldn't. –  Cory Nelson Feb 19 '12 at 1:51
    
Statics are thread-safe but are not lazy. myMutex must be static if you want _lazy static but you said you do not want that. This lazy initialization in a thread-safe manner problem is exactly what is called singleton pattern. It has been discussed many times in many places. –  Maciej Dopieralski Feb 19 '12 at 9:19

You might also look at how this problem is solved internally in TBB. The name to search for in the code is atomic_do_once; it's an internal (at the moment of writing) TBB function for lazy initialization. The definition of this function and auxiliary stuff is in src/tbb_misc.h, and there are a few places in other files where it is used.

The basic idea is the same as in @CoryNelson's answer, but generalized with the help of a tri-state flag (see enum do_once_state). One needs to create a static variable of type tbb::atomic<do_once_state>, and pass it, together with a function/functor that should be run once, into a call to atomic_do_once. For example:

void initialize_once();
static tbb::atomic<tbb::internal::do_once_state> init_state;
/*...*/
// Safe to execute concurrently
tbb::internal::atomic_do_once( &initialize_once, init_state );

For long-running initialization, using tbb::mutex like recommended by @MaciejDopieralski is preferred, as it avoids excessive CPU usage by putting waiting thread(s) to sleep. Note that most other mutex flavors in TBB also spin, not sleep.

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Is it okay to occasionally call create_lazy more than once? If so this is a very lightweight, efficient solution using only TBB:

tbb::atomic<LAZY*> lazy;

if(!lazy)
{
    LAZY *newlazy = create_lazy();

    if(lazy.compare_and_swap(newlazy, 0))
    {
        // lazy was initialized elsewhere.
        delete newlazy;
    }
}

// use lazy.

This will have much less (zero!) overhead than Maciej's solution, but again will only work if it's okay to occasionally call create_lazy more than once in the event that there is contention among threads on that specific variable.

One way to avoid both a mutex and calling create_lazy more than once is to use a spin loop. This will use more CPU than a mutex if there is contention, but will still be low overhead:

tbb::atomic<LAZY*> lazy;
static int sentry;

if(!lazy && !lazy.compare_exchange((LAZY*)&sentry, 0))
{
    // lazy is set to a sentry value while being allocated.
    try{ lazy = create_lazy(); }
    catch(...) { lazy = 0; throw; }
}
else
{
    // yield the thread while lazy is still set to the sentry.
    while(lazy == (LAZY*)&sentry)
    {
        tbb::this_tbb_thread::yield();
    }
}

// use lazy.
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Sorry, I forgot to mention that such LAZY objects cannot be over-allocated for that it is quite expensive to create them, and they use a lot of other resources. –  ssquidd Feb 18 '12 at 22:49
    
Allowing an object to be created more than once is bad practice and makes the code not thread safe. Overhead of locking will be negligible because it will happen only ONCE, during first creation. Hence double check. –  Maciej Dopieralski Feb 18 '12 at 22:55
    
@ssquidd In that case, I've edited it with a new way. –  Cory Nelson Feb 18 '12 at 22:59
    
@Maciej The object isn't being created more than once. Two separate objects might be created, but only one of them will be used in the end. A mutex is a lot of storage overhead for something that'll only be used once, so I'm trying to avoid that. –  Cory Nelson Feb 18 '12 at 23:00
    
It is always bad practice. You may end up with two threads accessing different _lazy objects. Mutex is designed exactly for this purpose - to access critical section, in this case creation of _lazy. Even if only one object is ever used, like you said, double creation is expensive especially in this particular case. –  Maciej Dopieralski Feb 18 '12 at 23:09

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