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I'm sure this is a rookie mistake but I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong with multiprocessing. I have this code(that just sits around and does nothing)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = Pool(processes=4)  
    for i, x in enumerate(data): 
        pool.apply_async(new_awesome_function, (i, x))
    pool.close()
    pool.join()

data is a list([1,2,3,4,5]) and I'm trying to take the list send each item to be done over multiple cpu but when I wrap my working command into a function and send this code it doesn't do anything(when I call the function itself without above code it works fine). So I think I'm using multiprocessing wrong(although I took examples from sites), any suggestions?

Update: I noticed that I can't even break out of it when it freezes with control-c..that always works to get out of my buggy programs. I looked at python2.5 multiprocessing Pool and tried to follow the advice and added the import inside my if statement but no luck

Update2: I'm sorry, just realized thanks to the answer below that the command works but it doesn't seem to be terminating the program or letting me force quit.

share|improve this question
    
Your problem is probably in my_awesome_function I think you'll need to show us that function. –  Winston Ewert Feb 19 '12 at 5:55
    
I just posted the code and the expected outcome(which works before I added the multiprocessing) –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 5:58
    
Its so weird, usually I get an error this just won't do anything and hangs. At first it would run but would not exit(it was a simple example) but after I put my full code in nothing runs and it still doesn't let me exit. I tried putting print statements all over to debug but none of them get triggered(even the ones outside the if statement –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 6:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know what database you are using, but chances are you can't share database connections between your processes like that.

On linux, fork() is used, which makes a copy of everything in memory when you start the subprocess. However things like socket, open files, and database connection won't work properly unless specifically designed to do so.

On Window, fork() is unavailable so it'll rerun your script. In your case, that'll be really bad cause it'll drop everything again. You could prevent that by dropping inside the if __name__ == '__main__': bit.

You should be able to reopen the database connections in the my_awesome_function and thus be able to sucesfully interact with the database.

Truth be told, you aren't going to gain any speed doing this. In fact, I expect this to be slower. See databases are really really slow. Your process is going to spend most of its time waiting for the database. Now you just have multiple processes waiting for the database and that really will not improve the situation.

But databases are for storing things. As long as you are doing processing, you should really do that inside your code before hitting the database. You are basically using the database a s a set, and your code would be much nicer using a python set. If you really need to put that stuff in a database, do that at the end of your program.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Winston. I'm doing this because when I stored this in a python dict I would get memory errors as the dict got very large. I'm using MySQL to store it now –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 14:09
    
by the way, I'm not using windows, only linux and mac desktops. I will try putting the connection statements within the function and see it lets the program run. Also, it was working before but very very slow as a single process(but no memory errors) so that is why I am trying to use multiprocess since each process is independent I thought I could spawn many of them to speed things up. –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 14:30
    
@Lostsoul, database was the wrong solution to your memory problems. I suggest that you post the pre-database version on codereview.stackexchange.com and ask for help reducing memory usage. –  Winston Ewert Feb 19 '12 at 18:23
    
You gave me a good idea. Thank you Winston. I think I was sharing the mysql command(which I didn't think of as sharing because its static). I am re-writing my code to see if I can keep everything contained in the function itself. Regarding memory, codereview won't help, the data I'm using is very very large and therfore the dict it creates becomes large. In test situations it works fine but as I use larger datasets it fails(Its over 10+gig table). Distributing it will be a pain also, so I figured I need persistent storage –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 18:55
    
@Lostsoul, code review might help because somebody might point a solution that doesn't need to keep as much state in memory, or a more effective way of accessing additional space. Databases are very heavyweight and almost certainly a better solution exists. –  Winston Ewert Feb 19 '12 at 19:28

Multiprocessing isn't threading.

You're probably doing something sorta like this

data = {}

def new_awesome_function(a, b):
    data[a] = b

After you run the script, data has not changed. This is because multiprocessing uses copies of your program. Your functions are being run, but they are run in copies of your program and thus have no effect on your original program.

In order to make use of multiprocessing you need to explicitly communicate from one process to another. With threading everything is shared, but with multiprocessing nothing is shared unless you explicitly share it.

The simplest way is to use return values:

def new_awesome_function(a, b):
    return a + b

result = pool.apply_async(new_awesome_function, (1, 2))
# later...
value = result.get()

See the python documentation: http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html, for other methods such as Queues, Pipes, and Managers. What you can't do is change your program state and expect that to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Good to know, but I'm not doing that. I have a function thats fully independent. It takes in two variables, and if the variables meet certain conditions then they are added to a database. The only thing external to the function is the list that I'm sending it. I might have over complicated it, really all I want is a way to send items of a list(the value and a count like in my above example) to a function and have that function do its work while using my cpu's. –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 5:29

Your code seems to work for me:

from multiprocessing import Pool
import time

def new_awesome_function(a,b):
    print(a,b, 'start')
    time.sleep(1)
    print(a,b, 'end')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    data = [1,2,3,4,5]
    pool = Pool(processes=4)
    for i, x in enumerate(data): 
        pool.apply_async(new_awesome_function, (i, x))
    pool.close()
    pool.join()

gave me:

0 1 start
1 2 start
2 3 start
3 4 start
1 2 end
0 1 end
4 5 start
2 3 end
3 4 end
4 5 end

What makes you think it doesn't work?


Edit: Try to run this and look at the output:

from multiprocessing import Pool
import time

def new_awesome_function(a,b):
    print(a,b, 'start')
    time.sleep(1)
    print(a,b, 'end')
    return a + b

if __name__ == '__main__':
    data = [1,2,3,4,5]
    pool = Pool(processes=4)
    results = []
        for i, x in enumerate(data): 
        r = pool.apply_async(new_awesome_function, (i, x))
        results.append((i,r))
    pool.close()
    already = []
    while len(already) < len(data):
        for i,r in results:
            if r.ready() and i not in already:
                already.append(i)
                print(i, 'is ready!')
    pool.join()

Mine is:

0 1 start
1 2 start
2 3 start
3 4 start
0 1 end
4 5 start
1 2 end
2 3 end
0 is ready!
3 4 end
1 is ready!
2 is ready!
3 is ready!
4 5 end
4 is ready!
share|improve this answer
    
I checked the output and your right it does work(data is coming out). But its not exiting the program when its done. it just hangs. –  Lostsoul Feb 18 '12 at 23:44
    
@Lostsoul: I guess it's the join() that is blocking everything. I don't have that problem on python-2.7 and python-3.2, but I don't have python-2.5, so I can't test on it. The reason might be that the async results are not available or something, try to add a specific return in the new_awesome_function and maybe check them in some way to see if they are ready() or something like that. –  Rik Poggi Feb 18 '12 at 23:56
    
hmm you got me thinking..I don't have any results to display actually, could that be it? I am running a command to process data and upload it to a database. I'm using python 2.6 but I can try to upgrade and see if it works. –  Lostsoul Feb 19 '12 at 0:00
    
@Lostsoul: Well that is a complete different thing (and more difficult), you need to sync the access to your resource. Anyway the code above shouldn't hang, try to run my new edit. –  Rik Poggi Feb 19 '12 at 0:12
    
What resource do you think needs to be synchronized? –  Winston Ewert Feb 19 '12 at 0:19

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