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public interface IMy<T>
{
    T Implementer
    {
        get;
    }
}
public class MyClass : IMy<MyClass>
{
    ...
}

But what I want is this:

public interface IMy
{
    I Implementer
    {
        get;
    }
}

Please accept that for some ca-razy reason I need an interface that defines a method that returns in the type of the implementer. No? Okay, suppose it's something like an XML explorer, so call my interface ITree for example.

Interfaces primarily help me organize (separate), but when I have one that requires I rely on a convention, it seems to defeat the purpose.

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The first snippet is generally the way to go to solve the "Parent needs to define a generic interface with subclass's types" problem. I do not understand why it doesn't work for you. Can you elaborate? –  Irfy Feb 19 '12 at 0:05
    
@Irfy Well, the convention I mentioned is clearly that you have to implement on MyClass with IMy<MyClass>, but nothing prevents you from implementing with IMy<OtherClass>. I probably misused the forum to gripe about a vague "dirty" feeling, but your comment is a valid answer. –  nik.shornikov Feb 19 '12 at 0:09
    
Just as a note to anyone who might land here -- my motivation for asking the question had a lot to do with unfamiliarity with generic interface type parameter contravariance. What I asked for seems more obscure in retrospect. –  nik.shornikov Feb 23 '12 at 0:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to be able to say "The interface should know who implements it, and automatically provide the implementer's type in its definition, to be inherited by the implementer"? Like

public interface IMy
{
    ImplicitImplementerType SomeProperty
    {
        get;
    }
}

I'm pretty sure that is impossible. Such a thing may be achieved in more dynamic languages though (I'm guessing here).

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That's what I would have liked because the dirty feeling actually propagates in my code as unnecessary-looking code (interface hierarchies, extension methods). I'll get used to it. –  nik.shornikov Feb 19 '12 at 0:30
1  
I suggest you to "feel grateful" for already knowing this actually very useful pattern :-) Many programmers write bad code not knowing how to solve contravariance problems. –  Irfy Feb 19 '12 at 0:48

You cannot statically specify such a return type. In C# (and in the CLR) there is no "thistype". But you can find it out at runtime:

var thisType = this.GetType()

Since I don't think this is what you need, I have to inform you that it is not possible to do what you want.

Of course, the first code snippet of yours would work but you don't want that.

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Good answer, but I don't want to take the dynamic plunge, and you correctly perceived that it's a whim. Someone else jumped in with a comment. Thank you. –  nik.shornikov Feb 19 '12 at 0:21

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