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I am learning C, and I finally solved the following exercise, after couple of hours of struggle:

"Write a program that merges lines alternately from two files and writes the results to stdout. If one file has less lines than the other, the remaining lines from the larger file should simply be copied to stdout."

However, I am not satisfied with the code. I feel that I over complicated it, and that there's a simpler solution.

How do I improve this code?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

int main (void)
{
    char file1[11], file2[11];
    FILE *input1, *input2;
    int c, d, i = 0;
    bool end_of_file1 = false, end_of_file2 = false;
    bool file1_newline = false, file2_newline = false;

    printf ("Enter the name of the two files to be merged,\
 separated by space: ");
    scanf ("%10s %10s", file1, file2);

    input1 = fopen (file1, "r");
    input2 = fopen (file2, "r");

    while ( end_of_file1 == false ) {
    if ( file1_newline == false )
        c = getc (input1);

    if ( end_of_file2 == true && end_of_file1 == false
                                         && i == 0 ) {
        putc ('\n', stdout);
        i = 1;
    }

    if ( c == '\n' && end_of_file2 == true )
        i = 0;

    if ( (c == '\n' && file1_newline == false) ||
               (c == EOF && file1_newline == false) ) {
        file1_newline = true;
        putc (' ', stdout);
    }

    if ( file1_newline == false )
        putc (c, stdout);

    if ( file1_newline == true )
        d = getc (input2);
    if ( d == EOF ) {
        end_of_file2 = true;
        if ( c == EOF )
        end_of_file1 = true;
    }
    if ( file1_newline == true && end_of_file2 == false )
        putc (d, stdout);
    if ( (d == '\n' && c != EOF) || end_of_file2 == true )
        file1_newline = false;
    }

    fclose (input1);
    fclose (input2);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Oleg V. Volkov, Tom Tanner, Tala, Rushi, Jakob S Sep 4 '13 at 8:17

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
You should consider submitting this to CodeReview.StackExchange.com; that site is dedicated to code review questions. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '12 at 2:00
    
Don't worry, it'll get moved there as soon as a moderator stops by. –  Brendan Long Feb 19 '12 at 2:01
1  
For some reason the close form doesn't offer that SE site as a choice under "off topic"... –  R.. Feb 19 '12 at 2:35
4  
Code review requests should go to CodeReview.StackExchange.com. –  Oleg V. Volkov Sep 4 '13 at 7:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Algorithmic issues

...Let's look at the question, instead of the code...

Write a program that merges lines alternately from two files and writes the results to stdout. If one file has fewer lines than the other, the remaining lines from the larger file should simply be copied to stdout.

Given that you are supposed to be dealing with lines, it seems better to read whole lines. For that, you should use fgets() or perhaps getline() (though the latter is less widely available than the former).

char line1[4096];
char line2[4096];

...

char *l1 = fgets(line1, sizeof(line1), input1);
char *l2 = fgets(line2, sizeof(line2), input2);

while (l1 != 0 && l2 != 0)
{
    fputs(line1, stdout);
    fputs(line2, stdout);
    l1 = fgets(line1, sizeof(line1), input1);
    l2 = fgets(line2, sizeof(line2), input2);
}

/* One file has reached EOF */

if (l1 != 0)
{
    fputs(line1, stdout);
    while (fgets(line1, sizeof(line1), input1) != 0)
        fputs(line1, stdout);
}
if (l2 != 0)
{
    fputs(line2, stdout);
    while (fgets(line2, sizeof(line2), input2) != 0)
        fputs(line2, stdout);
}

Nitpicking style

Personally, I don't like the way you have spaces around the parentheses on functions - K&R distinguish between operators such as if and for where there's a space separating the keyword and the expression and function calls where there is no such space. It is a style issue, though, so very subjective.

These lines of code give ample ammunition:

    bool end_of_file1 = false, end_of_file2 = false;
    bool file1_newline = false, file2_newline = false;

    printf ("Enter the name of the two files to be merged,\
 separated by space: ");
    scanf ("%10s %10s", file1, file2);

    input1 = fopen (file1, "r");
    input2 = fopen (file2, "r");

Don't combine multiple declarations on a single line, especially when they're initialized.

bool end_of_file1 = false;
bool end_of_file2 = false;
bool file1_newline = false;
bool file2_newline = false;

(But you get plus points for using suffixes 1 and 2 rather than 'no suffix' and 2.)

Don't split string literals across lines with backslashes. That is a very antique way to do it. Use string concatenation, standard since 1989 (and fix the grammar too). Note that among the many defects of the backslash-newline technique are that it screws up the indentation of the code and it is very vulnerable to editing errors.

printf("Enter the names of the two files to be merged,"
       " separated by space: ");

Consider a fflush(stdout); before reading. In practice, it isn't usually necessary, but worth thinking about. Notice that the user can enter the two names on separate lines; that will also work. Limiting the file names to just 10 characters is rather parsimonious, I think; you should probably allow for at least 256 characters. It is good that you specified the size of the strings in format arguments, and did so correctly (at sizeof(array)-1, not sizeof(array)). A more useful design of program would probably take the file names from the command line arguments to the program, rather than prompting the user for the names.

Always test the result of scanf():

if (scanf("%10s %10s", file1, file2) != 2)
    ...something went wrong...

Always test the result of fopen():

if ((input1 = fopen (file1, "r")) == 0)
    ...something went wrong...
if ((input2 = fopen (file2, "r")) == 0)
    ...something went wrong...

More of your code

while ( end_of_file1 == false ) {
if ( file1_newline == false )
    c = getc (input1);

if ( end_of_file2 == true && end_of_file1 == false
                                     && i == 0 ) {
    putc ('\n', stdout);
    i = 1;
}

Indent the body of your loop by one level (or, on StackOverflow, do not use tabs). You are correct to use int for c (and later d).

The logic which follows in the loop is ... obscure. It is not clear what you are up to. Generally, you want to head off EOF as soon as you can; you wait a while before doing that test. The body of the loop is inscrutable to me - very complex logic (well, it looks complex; I suspect the underlying logic is simple, but since there's no explanation of what it does, it looks convoluted).

share|improve this answer
    
Would the down-voter care to explain what is wrong with this analysis? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '12 at 2:14
    
+1 to offset the downvote (and also because, as usual, your answer merits it). Consider moving the "meatier" advice toward the top and the nit-picking to the bottom, perhaps renamed to something like "style and readability." I suspect the downvoter took issue with the negative tone. Marketing is everything ... sigh. –  Adam Liss Feb 19 '12 at 2:30
    
@AdamLiss: Thanks. I've adopted your advice on reordering the halves of the answer. At the time of the downvote, the algorithmic analysis was not yet present, but when code is offered for review, then 'negative tone' may be justifiable. I did try to pick up on the good points! –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '12 at 2:36
    
Agreed. It's difficult to criticize without offending someone, especially given the tendency of some software developers to think they know more than they actually do. ;-) To combat this, our corporate culture errs on the side of being respectful and polite when reviewing code, even though we all know the goal is to build the best products, rather than to serve our egos. Personally, I wish my reviewers were all as thorough and helpful as your answer! –  Adam Liss Feb 19 '12 at 2:45
    
Wow, thanks! Upvoted and accepted. –  user731914 Feb 19 '12 at 2:46
  • Generally, but especially when variable names "read well", do not use == false and == true.
  • Extract complex boolean expressions to readable boolean variables.
  • Use readable variable names if their usage is unclear (for example i).
  • Use additional functions with readable names, for chunks of code that have a specific purpose.
  • Reorganize (merge, nest, unnest, sort) your ifs to the simplest possible form. In the most general sense, Karnaugh maps may help; in any case, it's usually something to be done manually, on paper.
  • Remove unused variables (e.g. file2_newline)
  • If you have any functionality which applies to different arguments, extracting the functionality to a separate function is a must.
  • If you do line-based editing/parsing, use line-based functions instead of char-based ones.
  • Try to keep your functions small, do not mix many purposes/intents into one function.

Apart from that (and other advices, others have given), the best advice you can get is to read code. Read a lot of code, known to be good code. I've had a good experience with the FreeBSD tcp/ip stack codebase, there are many other good examples.


I thought I'd try to apply my own above advice to your code, and this is what I got:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <string.h>

#define BUFSIZE 10
char buffer[BUFSIZE];

bool append_line_and_check_eof(FILE *input, char newline_replacement);
bool process_line(FILE *to_process, FILE *other, char newline_replacement);

int main(void) {
    char file1[11], file2[11];
    FILE *input1, *input2;

    printf("Enter the name of the two files to be merged, separated by space: \n");
    fflush(stdout);
    scanf("%10s %10s", file1, file2);

    input1 = fopen(file1, "r");
    input2 = fopen(file2, "r");
    if (!input1 || !input2)
        return 1;

    while (process_line(input1, input2, ' ') && process_line(input2, input1, 0))
        printf("\n");

    fclose(input1);
    fclose(input2);

    return 0;
}

// prints a line from 'to_process', appends all from 'other' if eof is reached.
// returns whether to continue processing or not.
bool process_line(FILE *to_process, FILE *other, char newline_replacement) {
    bool eof = append_line_and_check_eof(to_process, newline_replacement);
    if (eof) {
        /* append rest from 'other' */
        while (fgets(buffer, BUFSIZE, other))
            printf("%s", buffer);
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

bool append_line_and_check_eof(FILE *input, char newline_replacement) {
    bool newline;

    do {
        if (!fgets(buffer, BUFSIZE, input))
            return true;

        /* discriminate between full buffer and eof */
        int len = strlen(buffer);
        newline = buffer[len - 1] == '\n';
        if (newline)
            buffer[len - 1] = newline_replacement;
        printf("%s", buffer);
    } while (!newline);

    return false;
}

The code is functionally equivalent to your code, written an a way that hopefully reads better and follows my advice from above.

share|improve this answer
    
It is reasonable to want to see all the lines of both files. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '12 at 3:06
    
@JonathanLeffler As I was editing OP's code locally, I messed a detail up, which ended up printing the rest of the larger file in a single line. So I thought it may or may not have been his intent, but the mistake was with me. Of course it is reasonable to see the rest of the larger file though ;-) –  Irfy Feb 19 '12 at 3:36

Here's an alternative way to do this.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if(argc != 3) return 1;

    FILE *fp, *fp2;
    char *line, *line2, buf[BUFSIZ];

    fp = fopen(argv[1], "r");
    if(!fp) {
        perror(argv[1]);
        return 0;
    }

    fp2 = fopen(argv[2], "r");
    if(!fp2) {
        perror(argv[2]);
        fclose(fp);
        return 0;
    }

    do {
        line  = fgets(buf, BUFSIZ, fp);
        if(line) printf("%s", line);

        line2  = fgets(buf, BUFSIZ, fp2);
        if(line2) printf("%s", line2);

    } while( line || line2 );


    fclose(fp);
    fclose(fp2);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. FYI: to indent code in the SO edit mode, highlight the code and then click on the {} icon - that indents by 4 spaces (unless everything is already indented by at least 4 spaces, in which case it will unindent). –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '12 at 3:09
    
@foo Have you actually tried running OP's code to see what its output is? What "merging" means in this case? –  Irfy Feb 19 '12 at 3:33
    
@ifry No, but I read the quoted problem description. It does not define the exact meaning of "merging". –  foo Feb 19 '12 at 4:10
    
@Jonathan Thanks! I had some initial problems and could not make any edits. –  foo Feb 19 '12 at 4:17
    
Don't forget that you're supposed to print the rest of the longer file. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '12 at 4:35