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I'm trying to write a small piece of code that merges lines alternatively from two files and writes the results to another file, all specified by the user.

Except, at the moment it seems to be ignoring the '\0' character and copies the entire file at a time, instead of a line at a time.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

int main (void)
{

    char in1Name[64], in2Name[64], outName[64];
    FILE *in1, *in2, *out;

    printf("Enter the name of the first file to be copied: ");
    scanf("%63s", in1Name);

    printf("Enter the name of the second file to be copied: ");
    scanf("%63s", in2Name);

    printf("Enter the name of the output file: ");
    scanf("%63s", outName);


    // Open all files for reading or writing
    if ( (in1 = fopen(in1Name, "r")) == NULL )  
    {
        printf("Error reading %s", in1Name);
        return 1;
    }

    if ( (in2 = fopen(in2Name, "r")) == NULL )
    {
        printf("Error reading %s", in2Name);
        return 2;
    }

    if ( (out = fopen(outName, "w")) == NULL )
    {
        printf("Error writing to %s", outName);
        return 3;
    }


    // Copy alternative lines to outFile
    bool notFinished1 = true, notFinished2 = true;
    int c1, c2;
    while ( (notFinished1) || (notFinished2) ) 
    {

        while ( ((c1 = getc(in1)) != '\0') && (notFinished1) )
        {
            if (c1 == EOF)
            {
                notFinished1 = false;
            }
            else
            {
                putc(c1, out);
            }
        }

        while ( ((c2 = getc(in2)) != '\0') && (notFinished2) )
        {
            if (c2 == EOF)
            {
                notFinished2 = false;
            }
            else
            {
                putc(c2, out);
            }
        }

    } 


    // Close files and finish
    fclose(in1);
    fclose(in2);
    fclose(out);

    printf("Successfully copied to %s.\n", outName);

    return 0;

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The newline character is '\n', not '\0'. The latter is a zero-valued (null) byte; inside C, it's used to indicate the end of a string, but text-files don't contain it.

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I feel like an idiot, why didn't I try this... I'm slightly confused, I've been using '\0' to detect the end of a line previously. I think I've been studying C for too long, I'm going to go to the beach now and take a break. –  gbhall Feb 19 '12 at 4:28
    
@gbhall: Re: "I've been using '\0' to detect the end of a line previously": Well, if you've been using something like fgets or getline to read in a whole line at once, then the last character in the string would be '\n', and after that would be a '\0' to indicate that the string has ended; so using '\0' to detect end-of-line would more-or-less work because of how C strings work. But if you've been using getc that way, then -- no. –  ruakh Feb 19 '12 at 14:28
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If these are text files, there won't normally be a \0 after each line -- that's almost exclusively for in-memory strings. \n is the newline char, and more than likely the char you want to check for.

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I have gone through your code, and found the error. To copy the files line by line you should be looking for '\n' instead of '\0'. The '\0' only terminates the string, it doesn't designate a new line. Replacing both instances of '\0' with '\n' will fix your problem.

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