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If I have a template with a bunch of other code in it. Will g++ re-generate all that code that's the same for every version of the template ?

For example:

template <typename> T
T parseSomething(const std::string& data) {
    // Some state variables go here
    enum State {state1,state2,state3} state;
    for(std::string::const_iterator i=data.begin();i!=data.end();++i) {
        // Some big testy stuff to see if we got in the right place
        switch (state) {
            case state1: {
                switch (*i) {
                    case f:  // ...
        // ... lots of switchy stuff here ..
        return T(*i);
    }
}

So in that func .. the only bit that really needs templates is the return T(*i) line.

Suppose I instantiated it with 4 different Ts eg.

parseSomething<float>(data);
parseSomething<int>(data);

etc.

Would g++ generate all that other code (the loop and the switch parts) a separate time for every T ?

Or would it be smart enough to only generate the switches and loops once .. then for each T .. generate the return T(*i); line ?

I tried testing and with -O0 it definitely duplicates the switches everywhere, but with the -O2 and above it was hard to tell; it appeared to be smarter .. but it was so smart, I couldn't decipher the ASM :)


Here's my sample program I'm trying to use to test with.

To compile:

g++ -std=c++0x -fverbose-asm -ggdb3 -fvar-tracking-assignments  -O6 -march=native  codegen.cpp

to run:

gdb --args ./a.out asdf1111

paranoid code version:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

char getSomething(const string& myString) {
    for(auto myPlase=myString.begin();myPlase!=myString.end();++myPlase) {
        if (*myPlase == 'f') {
            return *(myPlase+1);
        }
    }
}

template <typename T>
T getSomething(const string& myString) {
    return T(getSomething(myString));
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    string base = argv[1];
    float myFloat = getSomething<float>(base);
    int myInt = getSomething<int>(base);
    char myChar = getSomething<char>(base);
    //string newString = getSomething<string>(base);
    cout << myFloat << " " << myInt << " " << myChar << endl;
}

code version I'd like to use:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
T getSomething(const string& myString) {
    for(auto myPlace=myString.begin();myPlace!=myString.end();++myPlace) {
        if (*myPlace == 'f') {
            return T(*(myPlace+1));
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    string base = argv[1];
    float myFloat = getSomething<float>(base);
    int myInt = getSomething<int>(base);
    char myChar = getSomething<char>(base);
    //string newString = getSomething<string>(base);
    cout << myFloat << " " << myInt << " " << myChar << endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
In the real world program I'm using ragel to generate the code, and it's about 1200 lines. I'd like to turn that into a template function, and the main templatey bit is the return type, but I don't want to see those 1200 lines be re-produced for every type. –  matiu Feb 19 '12 at 5:17
1  
If you were GCC, how would you generate the code in question? –  n.m. Feb 19 '12 at 6:31
1  
Of course the real question is: in the paranoid code example, is the call to getsomething inlined :) ? –  Matthieu M. Feb 19 '12 at 11:04
1  
Why don't you just extract the conversion out of the parsing? That would guarantee a single function, and you could even forward declare it now and only implement it in one translation unit. Why can't you just return whatever *i returns and convert it at the call site? –  Xeo Feb 20 '12 at 5:31
    
Yeah, I think that's the way I'm gonna go. The parsing can generate types out of *i or build up a result from parsing a sequence of chars. I'm gonna see if I can separate out the parsing into different funcs and go with the 'paranoid' way. –  matiu Feb 20 '12 at 6:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't think compilers are smart enough to coalesce code that is independent of the template parameter. In other words, the function will be instantiated 4 times, once for each T.

On linux, you can use readelf -s on the resulting object file to dump public symbols and readelf -S to dump sections; each non-inlined non-static function will have a (mangled) entry in the symbol table. AFAIK, template instatiations go each in its own section, so that they can be coalesced at link-time.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @zvrba .. yeah, the trouble is as soon as I turn on anything >= -O1 it inlines the whole lot, and the ASM looks really complicated so I'm not really able to tell if it's taking out the loop and switch stuff. I'm leaning towards it probably doesn't take it out; and going with the paranoid code I think. –  matiu Feb 19 '12 at 7:34

It's fairly uncommon to have a large block of non-parameterized code inside a template, be it a class or a function.

It doesn't sound very hard to detect a big chunk of code that doesn't depend on parameters. The engine would just have to record some metric of subtree size in relevant AST nodes, and whether any child node is a template parameter.

But the optimization you suggest essentially requires to separate inner scopes from outer scopes, which means refactoring them into a new function. What if instead of a temporary, you had a named variable whose lifetime included the inner switch? The stack would be rearranged, the inner scopes would depend on the variable despite possibly not referencing it, and local variables would have to be passed to the switch as reference arguments. It would be a fragile, complicated optimization.

If template bloat is an issue, I'd seriously recommend the "paranoid" version, which separates template concerns into a wrapper function. Such wrappers should never be very complicated, since the point is to avoid bloat!

If meta-bloat is another problem (I just read that you're using a code generator and are worried about the source code size of thousands of such template wrappers), you might consider altering the interface a little:

template< typename T, char (*func)( std::string const & ) >
T get_anything( std::string const &s ) {
    return T( func( s ) );
}

This way, there can be many get_something() functions, and they can all be used as the second template argument to get_anything. You could also use a pointer-to-member instead of a function pointer as the template parameter.

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