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I have seen many times things like this:

function customArrayIndexOf(item, array){
    for (var i = 0, l = array.length; i < l; i++) {
        if (i in array && array[i] === item) return i;
    }
    return -1;
}

However, I am not sure why is the i in array needed.

I have three questions:

  • What it is doing?
  • Is it necessary?
  • When it will fail without it?
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sparse arrays may cause a false positive without the check:

var customArrayIndexOf = function(item, array){
    for (var i = 0, l = array.length; i < l; i++) {
        if (i in array && array[i] === item) return i;
    }
    return -1;
},
customArrayIndexOfNoCheck = function(item, array){
    for (var i = 0, l = array.length; i < l; i++) {
        if (array[i] === item) return i;
    }
    return -1;
};

var t=[]; t[1]=1;

customArrayIndexOfNoCheck(undefined, t); // 0
customArrayIndexOf(undefined, t); // -1

(i and l should be local, i.e. declared with var)

share|improve this answer
    
isn't t[0] == undefined? –  mithril333221 Feb 19 '12 at 6:21
    
@mithril333221, no it isn't, try it yourself; the native implementation var t=[];t[1]=1;t.indexOf(undefined); returns -1. While t[0]===undefined that doesn't mean that there is an entry of undefined in the array, it just means that the native lookup function returned that value. –  davin Feb 19 '12 at 6:23
    
@davin okey, i will accept your answer. just a last thing, why it is -1?, edit: your edit answered this, so I guess there is no need for further aclarations –  mithril333221 Feb 19 '12 at 6:24
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