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I have a div (.outer - the viewport) with fixed height that contains another div (.inner - the content) which should be scrollable. The .inner div is positioned absolute with bottom: 0 so that we can always see what's on the bottom of this div.

The problem is that when this bottom: 0 is added to .inner, the scrollbar of the .outer becames gray and is not active. If we remove the bottom: 0, the scrollbar works, but we see the top, and not the bottom of the .inner.

This is the HTML:

<div class="outer">
    <div class="inner">
        this content should be scolled to the bottom possibly with bottom: 0; AND we should still have to scrollbar the scroll to the top<br/>
        1<br/>
        2<br/>
        3<br/>
        4<br/>
        5<br/>
        6<br/>
        7<br/>
        8<br/>
        9<br/>
        10<br/>
        11<br/>
        12<br/>
        13<br/>
        14<br/>
        15<br/>
        16<br/>
        17<br/>
        18<br/>
        19<br/>
        20<br/>
        bottom (the scrollbar must be active)
    </div>
</div>​

CSS:

.outer {
    height: 200px; 
    position: relative;
    overflow-y: scroll;
    width:270px;
}
.inner {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
    background-color:#aaa;
    width:250px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/SAyhn/8/

Using jQuery to show the bottom of the .inner in the .outer's viewport is also acceptable.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The outer div isn't actually scrolled down in your example. What happens there is that the inner div is positioned in relation to the outer div. Since it's bottom:0, it means that it fills the entire div and the rest overflows above the element so there's nothing to scroll. (You can try setting it to bottom:-10px which gives 10 pixels room for a scroll.)

You can't set the scroll position with CSS alone, you need some JavaScript:

var outer = document.getElementsByClassName( 'outer' );
outer[0].scrollTo( 0, 10000 );​​​  

Or with jQuery:

$( '.outer' ).scrollTop( 10000 );
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That works delightful. :) You can't image how grateful I am. –  isHristov Feb 19 '12 at 9:43

I actually went a little further with you suggestion and I left position: absolute and bottom: 0 to the .inner div (to have this content at the bottom (when the page is loaded) in case the .inner has less height that the .outer) and I added this:

if($('.outer').outerHeight() < $('.inner').outerHeight()) {
    $('.inner').css("bottom", "auto");
    $('.outer').scrollTop($('.inner').outerHeight());
}

This way I have the .inner shown at the bottom (if it has less height that the .outer) by default and I execute the code above everytime I put additional content to the .inner div to make an actual scroll if it is necessary.

Many thanks once again. :)

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